In the Journals

Calcium hydroxylapatite shows efficacy in treating hand volume loss for up to 1 year

A single treatment with calcium hydroxylapatite dermal filler for volume loss in the dorsum of the hands showed improvement for up to 12 months posttreatment, according to published study results in Dermatologic Surgery.

Mitchel P. Goldman, MD, of the Dermatology Cosmetic Laser Medical Associates of La Jolla, in San Diego, and colleagues conducted a prospective, masked study of 114 patients aged at least 18 years with a rating of 2 or 3 for both hands on the validated Merz Hand Grading Scale. (MHGS). Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale was used to measure patient-reported improvement.

Mitchel P. Goldman, MD
Mitchel P. Goldman

There were 85 patients (mean age, 52.8 years; 95.3% female) randomized to an immediate-treatment group, while 29 patients (mean age, 54.8; 96.6% female) were untreated through 3 months of enrollment (untreated control group).

The patients received the calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA) filler injection, which included 2% lidocaine HCL, in the dorsum of both hands using a 27-gauge needle.

Of the treated patients, 75.3% demonstrated improvement of at least 1 point on the MHGS at 3 months, compared with 3.4% of patients in the untreated control group (P < .001). The response was generally maintained through 12 months posttreatment: 73.9% had at least a 1 point improvement on the MHGS at 6 months and 71.7% had at least a 1 point improvement at 12 months.

When the patients who had delayed treatment began treatment at 3 months postenrollment, the proportions of durable improvement were similar, the researchers reported.

The percentage of patients reporting improvement ranged from 98% at 3 months to 86% at 12 months.

The two treatment cohorts did not have any clinically significant difference in hand function measures.

Most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity and were generally typical of other CaHA studies, with the most common adverse events including swelling, pain, redness and bruising.

“A key finding of this study was the observed durability of CaHA treatment effectiveness; similar MHGS results were maintained through 12 months postenrolment after a single treatment,” the researchers wrote. “In addition, the proportion of all treated hands rated as improved remained > 85% through the end of the study.” – by Bruce Thiel

 

Disclosure: The study was sponsored by Merz North America. All the researchers report having been investigators and/or consultants for Merz North America.

A single treatment with calcium hydroxylapatite dermal filler for volume loss in the dorsum of the hands showed improvement for up to 12 months posttreatment, according to published study results in Dermatologic Surgery.

Mitchel P. Goldman, MD, of the Dermatology Cosmetic Laser Medical Associates of La Jolla, in San Diego, and colleagues conducted a prospective, masked study of 114 patients aged at least 18 years with a rating of 2 or 3 for both hands on the validated Merz Hand Grading Scale. (MHGS). Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale was used to measure patient-reported improvement.

Mitchel P. Goldman, MD
Mitchel P. Goldman

There were 85 patients (mean age, 52.8 years; 95.3% female) randomized to an immediate-treatment group, while 29 patients (mean age, 54.8; 96.6% female) were untreated through 3 months of enrollment (untreated control group).

The patients received the calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA) filler injection, which included 2% lidocaine HCL, in the dorsum of both hands using a 27-gauge needle.

Of the treated patients, 75.3% demonstrated improvement of at least 1 point on the MHGS at 3 months, compared with 3.4% of patients in the untreated control group (P < .001). The response was generally maintained through 12 months posttreatment: 73.9% had at least a 1 point improvement on the MHGS at 6 months and 71.7% had at least a 1 point improvement at 12 months.

When the patients who had delayed treatment began treatment at 3 months postenrollment, the proportions of durable improvement were similar, the researchers reported.

The percentage of patients reporting improvement ranged from 98% at 3 months to 86% at 12 months.

The two treatment cohorts did not have any clinically significant difference in hand function measures.

Most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity and were generally typical of other CaHA studies, with the most common adverse events including swelling, pain, redness and bruising.

“A key finding of this study was the observed durability of CaHA treatment effectiveness; similar MHGS results were maintained through 12 months postenrolment after a single treatment,” the researchers wrote. “In addition, the proportion of all treated hands rated as improved remained > 85% through the end of the study.” – by Bruce Thiel

 

Disclosure: The study was sponsored by Merz North America. All the researchers report having been investigators and/or consultants for Merz North America.