Meeting News

Novel approach improves outcomes in vaginal rejuvenation

Transcutaneous temperature-controlled radiofrequency was associated with improvements in a number of parameters in female vaginal genital rejuvenation, including vulvovaginal laxity and atrophic vaginitis, according to findings presented at the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Annual Meeting.

Monique Wilson, MD, a dermatologist with the California Skin Institute, and colleagues suggested that histopathologic evidence of this treatment approach remains lacking. Further, the clinical community remains uncertain about how this approach improves atrophic vaginitis, orgasmic dysfunction and stress urinary incontinence.

The current prospective, nonrandomized trial included 10 women treated at a single center. Eligible participants had self-described mild to moderate primary or secondary vulvovaginal laxity, with or without atrophic vaginitis, orgasmic dysfunction and/or stress urinary incontinence, according to study background.

Transcutaneous temperature-controlled radiofrequency treatments were performed three times in each patient at 4-week intervals.

Both patients and investigators assessed results at baseline and days 10, 30, 60 and 120. Biopsies of the labia majora and vaginal canal were performed before and after treatment in a subset of five patients.

A significant improvement in investigator-rated vulvovaginal laxity was reported between baseline and day 10 (P = .001), according to the results. This improvement persisted through day 120 (P = .001).

Vulvovaginal laxity also improved significantly from baseline to day 120 in the patient-rated analysis (P = .03).

A 51% to 75% improvement in atrophic vaginitis symptoms was reported by 57.1% of the patients at day 120, while 14.3% reported a 76% to 100% improvement in these symptoms at that time point.

Patients also reported a significant improvement in sexual satisfaction from baseline at day 60 (P = .001) and day 120 (P = .02).

A steadily increasing but nonsignificant improvement in orgasmic function was reported by patients from baseline through day 120, according to the findings.

Day 120 findings also indicated that 55.6% of the cohort had a 50% improvement in self-reported stress urinary incontinence, while 33.3% of the cohort reported a 76% to 100% improvement in this parameter.

The 120-day patient satisfaction rate with the procedure was 77.8%.

Biopsy results after the intervention showed improved epithelial maturation, increased elastic fibers and neocollagenesis, along with an increase in small nerve fiber density in the papillary dermis.

“To date, this is the first report of increased nerve fiber density after treatment with transcutaneous temperature-controlled radiofrequency,” the researchers concluded. – by Rob Volansky

Reference: Wilson M, et al. Histologic and clinical changes in vulvovaginal tissue after treatment with a transcutaneous temperature-controlled radiofrequency device. Presented at: American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Annual Meeting; Oct. 5-8, 2017; Chicago.

Disclosures: The study was funded by Thermigen. The authors report no other relevant financial disclosures.

Transcutaneous temperature-controlled radiofrequency was associated with improvements in a number of parameters in female vaginal genital rejuvenation, including vulvovaginal laxity and atrophic vaginitis, according to findings presented at the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Annual Meeting.

Monique Wilson, MD, a dermatologist with the California Skin Institute, and colleagues suggested that histopathologic evidence of this treatment approach remains lacking. Further, the clinical community remains uncertain about how this approach improves atrophic vaginitis, orgasmic dysfunction and stress urinary incontinence.

The current prospective, nonrandomized trial included 10 women treated at a single center. Eligible participants had self-described mild to moderate primary or secondary vulvovaginal laxity, with or without atrophic vaginitis, orgasmic dysfunction and/or stress urinary incontinence, according to study background.

Transcutaneous temperature-controlled radiofrequency treatments were performed three times in each patient at 4-week intervals.

Both patients and investigators assessed results at baseline and days 10, 30, 60 and 120. Biopsies of the labia majora and vaginal canal were performed before and after treatment in a subset of five patients.

A significant improvement in investigator-rated vulvovaginal laxity was reported between baseline and day 10 (P = .001), according to the results. This improvement persisted through day 120 (P = .001).

Vulvovaginal laxity also improved significantly from baseline to day 120 in the patient-rated analysis (P = .03).

A 51% to 75% improvement in atrophic vaginitis symptoms was reported by 57.1% of the patients at day 120, while 14.3% reported a 76% to 100% improvement in these symptoms at that time point.

Patients also reported a significant improvement in sexual satisfaction from baseline at day 60 (P = .001) and day 120 (P = .02).

A steadily increasing but nonsignificant improvement in orgasmic function was reported by patients from baseline through day 120, according to the findings.

Day 120 findings also indicated that 55.6% of the cohort had a 50% improvement in self-reported stress urinary incontinence, while 33.3% of the cohort reported a 76% to 100% improvement in this parameter.

The 120-day patient satisfaction rate with the procedure was 77.8%.

Biopsy results after the intervention showed improved epithelial maturation, increased elastic fibers and neocollagenesis, along with an increase in small nerve fiber density in the papillary dermis.

“To date, this is the first report of increased nerve fiber density after treatment with transcutaneous temperature-controlled radiofrequency,” the researchers concluded. – by Rob Volansky

Reference: Wilson M, et al. Histologic and clinical changes in vulvovaginal tissue after treatment with a transcutaneous temperature-controlled radiofrequency device. Presented at: American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Annual Meeting; Oct. 5-8, 2017; Chicago.

Disclosures: The study was funded by Thermigen. The authors report no other relevant financial disclosures.