AAD identifies procedures that may be unnecessary as part of Choosing Wisely campaign

The American Academy of Dermatology released recommendations regarding dermatologic tests and treatments it recommends are not always necessary.

It is the second list developed by the AAD as part of the Choosing Wisely campaign, an ABIM Foundation initiative designed to help patients avoid care that may be unnecessary for them, according to a press release.

“The [AAD] and its members are committed to serving as good stewards of limited health care resources, and we want to empower out patients to make informed health care decisions,” Mark Lebwohl, MD, FAAD, president of the AAD, said in the release. “By identifying procedures that may not be necessary, the academy’s new Choosing Wisely list can help patients with skin, hair and nail conditions start a conversation with their dermatologist about what tests and treatments are right for them.”

The AAD’s new Choosing Wisely list was released in conjunction with its Summer Academy Meeting. According to the release, recommendations include:

  • Not using systemic corticosteroids as long-term treatment for dermatitis. The potential complications of long-term treatment outweighs potential benefit, according to the release.
  • Avoiding the use of skin prick tests or blood tests including the roadioallergosorbent test for evaluating eczema. “When testing for suspected allergies is deemed necessary in patients with dermatitis or eczema, it is better to conduct patch test with ingredients of products that come in contact with the patient’s skin,” the release stated.
  • Not using microbiologic testing for studying and managing acne, which is typically unnecessary for typical acne patients, the release reported.
  • Avoiding routine use of antibiotics to treat bilateral swelling and redness of the lower leg, unless there is clear evidence of infection. Bilateral lower leg cellulitis is very rare, and another condition, such as dermatitis, resulting from leg swelling, varicose veins or contact allergies, most likely is the cause of swelling and redness of both legs, according to the release.
  • Antibiotics should not routine be prescribed for inflamed epidermal cysts. Infection should be confirmed before treating cysts with antibiotics, according to the AAD.

The recommendations are in addition to others that were included in a Choosing Wisely list that the AAD released in 2013.

Reference: www.aad.org

 

The American Academy of Dermatology released recommendations regarding dermatologic tests and treatments it recommends are not always necessary.

It is the second list developed by the AAD as part of the Choosing Wisely campaign, an ABIM Foundation initiative designed to help patients avoid care that may be unnecessary for them, according to a press release.

“The [AAD] and its members are committed to serving as good stewards of limited health care resources, and we want to empower out patients to make informed health care decisions,” Mark Lebwohl, MD, FAAD, president of the AAD, said in the release. “By identifying procedures that may not be necessary, the academy’s new Choosing Wisely list can help patients with skin, hair and nail conditions start a conversation with their dermatologist about what tests and treatments are right for them.”

The AAD’s new Choosing Wisely list was released in conjunction with its Summer Academy Meeting. According to the release, recommendations include:

  • Not using systemic corticosteroids as long-term treatment for dermatitis. The potential complications of long-term treatment outweighs potential benefit, according to the release.
  • Avoiding the use of skin prick tests or blood tests including the roadioallergosorbent test for evaluating eczema. “When testing for suspected allergies is deemed necessary in patients with dermatitis or eczema, it is better to conduct patch test with ingredients of products that come in contact with the patient’s skin,” the release stated.
  • Not using microbiologic testing for studying and managing acne, which is typically unnecessary for typical acne patients, the release reported.
  • Avoiding routine use of antibiotics to treat bilateral swelling and redness of the lower leg, unless there is clear evidence of infection. Bilateral lower leg cellulitis is very rare, and another condition, such as dermatitis, resulting from leg swelling, varicose veins or contact allergies, most likely is the cause of swelling and redness of both legs, according to the release.
  • Antibiotics should not routine be prescribed for inflamed epidermal cysts. Infection should be confirmed before treating cysts with antibiotics, according to the AAD.

The recommendations are in addition to others that were included in a Choosing Wisely list that the AAD released in 2013.

Reference: www.aad.org