Meeting News Coverage

Plastic surgeons present research on facial fat volumization, stem cell use

A panel of plastic surgeons presented findings on facial fat volumization and the use of fat as a rejuvenator through the harvesting of stem cells, during The Aesthetic Meeting in San Francisco.

“The use of fat to add volume to the face is the best thing to happen to plastic surgery since the debut of the facelift,” panelist Val Lambros, MD, said in a press release from the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. “It is truly the best substance imaginable when used appropriately and in reasonable quantities.”

Val Lambros, MD 

Val Lambros

Best practices for facial fat volumization, as well as the use of fat as a biologic therapy and a “facial rejuvenator” through the use of stem cell harvesting were discussed by the panelists.

“The stem cells in fat can impact dermal thickness, collagen production and stimulation of new blood vessels — all key components of regeneration and restoration,” panelist Steven R. Cohen, MD, said in the release.

Fat subcutaneously impacts blood vessels, which can repair tissue, the release stated.

Sun damage, smoker’s lines, scarring and pigmentation can be corrected through fat volumization, according to the panelists. By recreating cells that are lost as a person ages, fat and stem cells from fat are apparent keys to slowing the aging process

The panelists agreed that other injectables are important for recreating facial volume, and must be determined on a case-by-case basis.

“There is always a battle between natural biology and synthetics, but as we learn more about how the body can be coaxed into regeneration, we can synergize the two to build scaffolding out of composite materials that are designed to attract healthy cells and encourage regrowth,” Cohen said.

 “You can yield spectacular results with fat; however, it is a biological material, and can therefore grow if a patient gains weight or can sometimes disappear completely,” Lambros added. “If it is overdone, it can result in complications, so knowing how to deal with these complications and potential side effects is crucial.”

For more information:

Presented at: The Aesthetics Meeting 2014; April 24-29, San Francisco.

A panel of plastic surgeons presented findings on facial fat volumization and the use of fat as a rejuvenator through the harvesting of stem cells, during The Aesthetic Meeting in San Francisco.

“The use of fat to add volume to the face is the best thing to happen to plastic surgery since the debut of the facelift,” panelist Val Lambros, MD, said in a press release from the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. “It is truly the best substance imaginable when used appropriately and in reasonable quantities.”

Val Lambros, MD 

Val Lambros

Best practices for facial fat volumization, as well as the use of fat as a biologic therapy and a “facial rejuvenator” through the use of stem cell harvesting were discussed by the panelists.

“The stem cells in fat can impact dermal thickness, collagen production and stimulation of new blood vessels — all key components of regeneration and restoration,” panelist Steven R. Cohen, MD, said in the release.

Fat subcutaneously impacts blood vessels, which can repair tissue, the release stated.

Sun damage, smoker’s lines, scarring and pigmentation can be corrected through fat volumization, according to the panelists. By recreating cells that are lost as a person ages, fat and stem cells from fat are apparent keys to slowing the aging process

The panelists agreed that other injectables are important for recreating facial volume, and must be determined on a case-by-case basis.

“There is always a battle between natural biology and synthetics, but as we learn more about how the body can be coaxed into regeneration, we can synergize the two to build scaffolding out of composite materials that are designed to attract healthy cells and encourage regrowth,” Cohen said.

 “You can yield spectacular results with fat; however, it is a biological material, and can therefore grow if a patient gains weight or can sometimes disappear completely,” Lambros added. “If it is overdone, it can result in complications, so knowing how to deal with these complications and potential side effects is crucial.”

For more information:

Presented at: The Aesthetics Meeting 2014; April 24-29, San Francisco.

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