In the Journals

Hyperhidrosis associated with anxiety, depression

There was a significant association between hyperhidrosis and the prevalence of anxiety and depression, according to recently published study results.

Researchers used Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scales to measure anxiety and depression in 2,017 consecutive outpatients (59% female; average age, 40 years) at dermatology clinics in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and Shanghai, China. Analysis was conducted to determine the impact of hyperhidrosis on anxiety and depression.

Patients with hyperhidrosis were an average of 5.3 years younger than patients without (P < .001).

Patients with hyperhidrosis had a significantly higher prevalence of anxiety (23.1% vs. 7.5%) and depression (27.2% vs. 9.7%) compared with those without hyperhidrosis (P < .001, all).

Hyperhidrosis severity and prevalence of anxiety and depression showed positive correlations.

Multivariable regression analyses controlling for other factors, including age, gender, ethnicity, presenting diagnosis of the patients’ skin conditions, and BMI, found a significant association between hyperhidrosis and depression and anxiety.

“The results of our study showed that both anxiety and depression were much more common in patients with [hyperhidrosis] compared with those without [hyperhidrosis] … and that this positive association was common to all [hyperhidrosis] subtypes, especially generalized or facial [hyperhidrosis],” the researchers wrote. “Assessment and management of anxiety and depression should be an essential component in management of patients with hyperhidrosis. – by Bruce Thiel

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

There was a significant association between hyperhidrosis and the prevalence of anxiety and depression, according to recently published study results.

Researchers used Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scales to measure anxiety and depression in 2,017 consecutive outpatients (59% female; average age, 40 years) at dermatology clinics in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and Shanghai, China. Analysis was conducted to determine the impact of hyperhidrosis on anxiety and depression.

Patients with hyperhidrosis were an average of 5.3 years younger than patients without (P < .001).

Patients with hyperhidrosis had a significantly higher prevalence of anxiety (23.1% vs. 7.5%) and depression (27.2% vs. 9.7%) compared with those without hyperhidrosis (P < .001, all).

Hyperhidrosis severity and prevalence of anxiety and depression showed positive correlations.

Multivariable regression analyses controlling for other factors, including age, gender, ethnicity, presenting diagnosis of the patients’ skin conditions, and BMI, found a significant association between hyperhidrosis and depression and anxiety.

“The results of our study showed that both anxiety and depression were much more common in patients with [hyperhidrosis] compared with those without [hyperhidrosis] … and that this positive association was common to all [hyperhidrosis] subtypes, especially generalized or facial [hyperhidrosis],” the researchers wrote. “Assessment and management of anxiety and depression should be an essential component in management of patients with hyperhidrosis. – by Bruce Thiel

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.