Survey finds children with eczema have been bullied, have lower self-esteem

The National Eczema Association has released results of a survey of patients with eczema and their caregivers that found that at least one in five children with eczema, including atopic dermatitis, will be bullied at school because of the disease, according to a press release.

“Medically treating and managing eczema is important – but so are understanding and addressing the psychosocial challenges of this disease,” Amy Paller, MD, director of the Northwestern University Skin Disease Research Center, stated in the release “The recent [National Eczema Association (NEA)] survey correlates with research I’ve co-authored in the past, showing a link between bullying related to chronic eczemas and a decrease in self-esteem and self-confidence. This can have tremendous long-term impact on their lives.”

Amy S. Paller, MD
Amy Paller

The NEA survey also found that more than 75% of patients with children who have been bullied due eczema reported that the child had experienced lower self-esteem as a result, according to the release.

The NEA, a non-profit 501c patient advocacy organization, is offering “Eczema: Tools for School” guide, a resource guide for parents and educators.

“Our survey showed that nearly 60% of patients believe that their child’s teacher does not understand eczema,” Julie Block, NEA president and CEO, stated in the release. “We encourage parents and caregivers to share our ‘Tools for School’ guide with their child’s teachers, so that together, educators, parents and students are aware of what the chronic condition, eczema, really is and the psychosocial impact it may have on a child’s self-esteem.”

Reference: www.nationaleczema.org

The National Eczema Association has released results of a survey of patients with eczema and their caregivers that found that at least one in five children with eczema, including atopic dermatitis, will be bullied at school because of the disease, according to a press release.

“Medically treating and managing eczema is important – but so are understanding and addressing the psychosocial challenges of this disease,” Amy Paller, MD, director of the Northwestern University Skin Disease Research Center, stated in the release “The recent [National Eczema Association (NEA)] survey correlates with research I’ve co-authored in the past, showing a link between bullying related to chronic eczemas and a decrease in self-esteem and self-confidence. This can have tremendous long-term impact on their lives.”

Amy S. Paller, MD
Amy Paller

The NEA survey also found that more than 75% of patients with children who have been bullied due eczema reported that the child had experienced lower self-esteem as a result, according to the release.

The NEA, a non-profit 501c patient advocacy organization, is offering “Eczema: Tools for School” guide, a resource guide for parents and educators.

“Our survey showed that nearly 60% of patients believe that their child’s teacher does not understand eczema,” Julie Block, NEA president and CEO, stated in the release. “We encourage parents and caregivers to share our ‘Tools for School’ guide with their child’s teachers, so that together, educators, parents and students are aware of what the chronic condition, eczema, really is and the psychosocial impact it may have on a child’s self-esteem.”

Reference: www.nationaleczema.org