Pediatric Annals

Case Challenges 

A Teenage Girl with Rash

Zoey Glick, BA; Amor Khachemoune, MD, CWS

Abstract

A teenage girl presented with a 2-week history of a mildly pruritic, erythematous, maculopapular rash on her back. The patient reported that a few weeks prior to onset of this rash, she remembered seeing a large “spot” on her lower abdomen. She presented to the dermatologist because she was concerned that her rash was contagious. She denied any sick contacts. On physical examination, she had numerous pink macules and papules, with scaly borders located on her trunk along axial lines (see Figure 1 and Figure 2). However, we were not able to visualize the “spot” she described on her abdomen.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Amor Khachemoune, MD, CWS, is with the Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. Zoey Glick, BA, is a Medical Student, George Washington University Medical School, Washington, DC.

Address correspondence to: Amor Khachemoune, MD, CWS, 530 First Avenue, Suite 7R, New York, NY 10016; fax (212) 263-7680; or e-mail: amorkh@pol.net.

The authors have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Abstract

A teenage girl presented with a 2-week history of a mildly pruritic, erythematous, maculopapular rash on her back. The patient reported that a few weeks prior to onset of this rash, she remembered seeing a large “spot” on her lower abdomen. She presented to the dermatologist because she was concerned that her rash was contagious. She denied any sick contacts. On physical examination, she had numerous pink macules and papules, with scaly borders located on her trunk along axial lines (see Figure 1 and Figure 2). However, we were not able to visualize the “spot” she described on her abdomen.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Amor Khachemoune, MD, CWS, is with the Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. Zoey Glick, BA, is a Medical Student, George Washington University Medical School, Washington, DC.

Address correspondence to: Amor Khachemoune, MD, CWS, 530 First Avenue, Suite 7R, New York, NY 10016; fax (212) 263-7680; or e-mail: amorkh@pol.net.

The authors have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

A teenage girl presented with a 2-week history of a mildly pruritic, erythematous, maculopapular rash on her back. The patient reported that a few weeks prior to onset of this rash, she remembered seeing a large “spot” on her lower abdomen. She presented to the dermatologist because she was concerned that her rash was contagious. She denied any sick contacts. On physical examination, she had numerous pink macules and papules, with scaly borders located on her trunk along axial lines (see Figure 1 and Figure 2). However, we were not able to visualize the “spot” she described on her abdomen.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Amor Khachemoune, MD, CWS, is with the Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. Zoey Glick, BA, is a Medical Student, George Washington University Medical School, Washington, DC.

Address correspondence to: Amor Khachemoune, MD, CWS, 530 First Avenue, Suite 7R, New York, NY 10016; fax (212) 263-7680; or e-mail: amorkh@pol.net.

The authors have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

10.3928/00904481-20081001-02

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents