In the Journals

Gain-switched 311-nm titanium:sapphire laser shows efficacy in treating vitiligo

A gain-switched 311-nm titanium:sapphire laser showed efficacy in treating vitiligo lesions on the face and neck after a median treatment of 23 sessions, according to recently published study results in JAMA Dermatology.

Researchers in Suwon, South Korea, conducted an open-label study between June 1, 2016, and Jan. 1, 2017, of 14 patients with nonsegmental vitiligo.

A gain-switched 311-nm titanium:sapphire laser (Pallas; Laseroptek) was used to treat the lesions twice weekly, with dosing starting at 300 mJ/cm2 and increased by 50 mJ/cm2 in each subsequent session until achieving posttreatment erythema.

Topical tacrolimus ointment, 0.1%, was applied to all lesions during treatment and sun protection was recommended.

Two dermatologists independently compared photographs taken at baseline and at final follow-up using a quartile grading scale to measure repigmentation level.

The median treatment duration was 3.7 months and the median cumulative dose was 11,850 mJ/cm2.

After medians of 21 treatments and 3.7 months, 11 patients demonstrated excellent-to-complete repigmentation; moderate repigmentation was reported for the other three patients.

Persistent erythema lasting more than 48 hours was experienced by five patients, with spontaneous improvement after 3 to 4 days. There was no stopping of treatment for serious adverse events.

“Because a majority of patients have limited involvement of their body surface, targeted phototherapy including a 308-nm xenon chloride excimer laser has been considered the treatment of choice of localized vitiligo,” the researchers wrote. “We observed a marked response using a 311-nm [titanium:sapphire laser] to treat patients with nonsegmental vitiligo on the face and neck. The initial response was fast, and the overall efficacy of [titanium:sapphire laser] treatment was comparable to that for [excimer laser] treatment. The gain-switched 311-nm [titanium:sapphire laser] is a promising option for treating vitiligo.” – by Bruce Thiel

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

A gain-switched 311-nm titanium:sapphire laser showed efficacy in treating vitiligo lesions on the face and neck after a median treatment of 23 sessions, according to recently published study results in JAMA Dermatology.

Researchers in Suwon, South Korea, conducted an open-label study between June 1, 2016, and Jan. 1, 2017, of 14 patients with nonsegmental vitiligo.

A gain-switched 311-nm titanium:sapphire laser (Pallas; Laseroptek) was used to treat the lesions twice weekly, with dosing starting at 300 mJ/cm2 and increased by 50 mJ/cm2 in each subsequent session until achieving posttreatment erythema.

Topical tacrolimus ointment, 0.1%, was applied to all lesions during treatment and sun protection was recommended.

Two dermatologists independently compared photographs taken at baseline and at final follow-up using a quartile grading scale to measure repigmentation level.

The median treatment duration was 3.7 months and the median cumulative dose was 11,850 mJ/cm2.

After medians of 21 treatments and 3.7 months, 11 patients demonstrated excellent-to-complete repigmentation; moderate repigmentation was reported for the other three patients.

Persistent erythema lasting more than 48 hours was experienced by five patients, with spontaneous improvement after 3 to 4 days. There was no stopping of treatment for serious adverse events.

“Because a majority of patients have limited involvement of their body surface, targeted phototherapy including a 308-nm xenon chloride excimer laser has been considered the treatment of choice of localized vitiligo,” the researchers wrote. “We observed a marked response using a 311-nm [titanium:sapphire laser] to treat patients with nonsegmental vitiligo on the face and neck. The initial response was fast, and the overall efficacy of [titanium:sapphire laser] treatment was comparable to that for [excimer laser] treatment. The gain-switched 311-nm [titanium:sapphire laser] is a promising option for treating vitiligo.” – by Bruce Thiel

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.