In the Journals

Modified diphenylcyclopropenone therapy may yield fewer adverse events in alopecia areata

A modified protocol for administering diphenylcyclopropenone was associated with an acceptable response and fewer adverse events in patients with alopecia areata, according to recent study results.

The retrospective study included 159 patients who were sensitized with 0.1% diphenylcyclopropenone, and then initiated treatment with 0.01% of the drug. Clinicians then slowly increased the concentration according to patient response and incidence of adverse events.

Results indicated a complete response in 28.9% of the cohort, and 37.1% experienced a partial response.

Following sensitization, no patients experienced adverse events. The overall severe adverse event rate during treatment was 1.9%, and 55 patients experienced moderate events. Antihistamines alone or with medium-potency topical steroids were sufficient to control all events.

The researchers observed no association between response and adverse events, according to the results.

“This study suggested that contact immunotherapy after subclinical sensitization has positive therapeutic effects with a lower incidence of [adverse events],” the researchers concluded. “Furthermore, these advantages help the patient continue treatment, thereby reducing relapse rates.” – by Rob Volansky

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

A modified protocol for administering diphenylcyclopropenone was associated with an acceptable response and fewer adverse events in patients with alopecia areata, according to recent study results.

The retrospective study included 159 patients who were sensitized with 0.1% diphenylcyclopropenone, and then initiated treatment with 0.01% of the drug. Clinicians then slowly increased the concentration according to patient response and incidence of adverse events.

Results indicated a complete response in 28.9% of the cohort, and 37.1% experienced a partial response.

Following sensitization, no patients experienced adverse events. The overall severe adverse event rate during treatment was 1.9%, and 55 patients experienced moderate events. Antihistamines alone or with medium-potency topical steroids were sufficient to control all events.

The researchers observed no association between response and adverse events, according to the results.

“This study suggested that contact immunotherapy after subclinical sensitization has positive therapeutic effects with a lower incidence of [adverse events],” the researchers concluded. “Furthermore, these advantages help the patient continue treatment, thereby reducing relapse rates.” – by Rob Volansky

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.