Meeting News

Dermatologists can learn from veterinarians, AAD presenter reports

Dermatologists can learn from veterinarians as they research treatments for pets’ skin conditions, as such treatments may also benefit human patient conditions, including atopic dermatitis and rosacea, according to a presenter at the American Academy of Dermatology Summer Meeting in New York.

“Dermatologists, veterinarians and scientists can learn a lot from one another,” Jennifer Gardner, MD, FAAD, an assistant professor of dermatology at University of Washington in Seattle and a collaborating member at the UW Center for One Health Research, stated in an AAD news release. “When we work together and share our expertise, it can improve the health of humans and animals alike, as well as the health of the environment they share.”

Gardner directed a session titled, “Comparative dermatology: Cases at the intersection of human and veterinary dermatology and the One Health paradigm.”

The One Health movement is a “concept that acknowledges the link between human health, animal health and the health of the environment,” according to Gardner’s presentation.

It extends back to a time when a single doctor would have cared for all members of a household, including animals, Gardner reported in the release.

Although medicine has become more specialized, collaboration across different medical and scientific disciplines has gained momentum over the past decade, according to the release.

Researchers have put effort into developing systemic and immune-based treatments for canine atopic dermatitis since the use of topical treatments is limited in animals. The results of the research could affect the way dermatologists treat atopic dermatitis in human patients, Gardner reported in the release.

Also, although microscopic mites that live on skin vary between species, their behavior is similar, so the study of mites in animals might be useful in treating mite-related human conditions, including rosacea and hair loss, Gardner reported.

Research through One Health also may “shed light on which conditions can be transferred from animals to humans and vice versa — and which ones can’t,” according to the release.

“In learning from other physicians and scientists, dermatologists can build on their own expertise to provide the best possible treatment for their patients,” Gardner stated in the release.


Reference: www.aad.org

Gardner J. FRM F004. Comparative dermatology: Cases at the intersection of human and veterinary dermatology and the One Health paradigm. Presented at: American Academy of Dermatology Summer Meeting; July 28-30, New York.

Disclosure: Gardner reports no relevant financial disclosures.

 

Dermatologists can learn from veterinarians as they research treatments for pets’ skin conditions, as such treatments may also benefit human patient conditions, including atopic dermatitis and rosacea, according to a presenter at the American Academy of Dermatology Summer Meeting in New York.

“Dermatologists, veterinarians and scientists can learn a lot from one another,” Jennifer Gardner, MD, FAAD, an assistant professor of dermatology at University of Washington in Seattle and a collaborating member at the UW Center for One Health Research, stated in an AAD news release. “When we work together and share our expertise, it can improve the health of humans and animals alike, as well as the health of the environment they share.”

Gardner directed a session titled, “Comparative dermatology: Cases at the intersection of human and veterinary dermatology and the One Health paradigm.”

The One Health movement is a “concept that acknowledges the link between human health, animal health and the health of the environment,” according to Gardner’s presentation.

It extends back to a time when a single doctor would have cared for all members of a household, including animals, Gardner reported in the release.

Although medicine has become more specialized, collaboration across different medical and scientific disciplines has gained momentum over the past decade, according to the release.

Researchers have put effort into developing systemic and immune-based treatments for canine atopic dermatitis since the use of topical treatments is limited in animals. The results of the research could affect the way dermatologists treat atopic dermatitis in human patients, Gardner reported in the release.

Also, although microscopic mites that live on skin vary between species, their behavior is similar, so the study of mites in animals might be useful in treating mite-related human conditions, including rosacea and hair loss, Gardner reported.

Research through One Health also may “shed light on which conditions can be transferred from animals to humans and vice versa — and which ones can’t,” according to the release.

“In learning from other physicians and scientists, dermatologists can build on their own expertise to provide the best possible treatment for their patients,” Gardner stated in the release.


Reference: www.aad.org

Gardner J. FRM F004. Comparative dermatology: Cases at the intersection of human and veterinary dermatology and the One Health paradigm. Presented at: American Academy of Dermatology Summer Meeting; July 28-30, New York.

Disclosure: Gardner reports no relevant financial disclosures.