In the Journals

Dupilumab rapidly improves itch in adults, adolescents with atopic dermatitis

Dupilumab showed rapid improvement in itch in patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis, according to an analysis of four phase 3 trials.

The analysis included 1,505 patients with AD, of which 251 were adolescents, in four randomized controlled studies: SOLO 1, SOLO 2, AD ADOL and CHRONOS. Adults in the studies received 300 mg of dupilumab every 2 weeks or placebo monotherapy, with concomitant topical corticosteroids. Adolescents between 12 and 18 years of age received dupilumab monotherapy of either 200 mg (patients under 60 kg) or 300 mg (patients over 60 kg) every 2 weeks or placebo.

“Dupilumab showed a clinically meaningful improvement in itch versus placebo after the first dose in adults and adolescents across all trials,” the study authors wrote.

Using the daily Peak Pruritus Numerical Rating Scale, dupilumab showed a statistically significant improvement in scores at day 2 for adults and at day 5 in adolescents vs. placebo.

The SOLO trials showed a change of –47.5% for dupilumab compared with –20.5% for placebo. The AD ADOL trial had a change of –47.9% compared with –19%, while the CHRONOS trial had a change of –57.3% compared with –30.9% (all P < .0001).

“These results support the role of dupilumab in improving itch outcomes associated with moderate to severe AD, starting with the first dose of treatment and providing long-term sustained control,” the authors wrote. by Rebecca L. Forand

 

Disclosures: Silverberg reports he has been an investigator for AbbVie, AnaptysBio, Arena, Asana, Boehringer Ingelheim, Dermira, Dermavant, DS Biopharma, Eli Lilly, Galderma, GlaxoSmithKline, Glenmark, Kiniksa, Leo Pharma, Novartis, Pfizer, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi; a consultant for AbbVie, Eli Lilly, Galderma, Galderma, Incyte, Kiniksa, Leo Pharma, Menlo Therapeutics, Pfizer, Realm, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi; and a speaker for Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Dupilumab showed rapid improvement in itch in patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis, according to an analysis of four phase 3 trials.

The analysis included 1,505 patients with AD, of which 251 were adolescents, in four randomized controlled studies: SOLO 1, SOLO 2, AD ADOL and CHRONOS. Adults in the studies received 300 mg of dupilumab every 2 weeks or placebo monotherapy, with concomitant topical corticosteroids. Adolescents between 12 and 18 years of age received dupilumab monotherapy of either 200 mg (patients under 60 kg) or 300 mg (patients over 60 kg) every 2 weeks or placebo.

“Dupilumab showed a clinically meaningful improvement in itch versus placebo after the first dose in adults and adolescents across all trials,” the study authors wrote.

Using the daily Peak Pruritus Numerical Rating Scale, dupilumab showed a statistically significant improvement in scores at day 2 for adults and at day 5 in adolescents vs. placebo.

The SOLO trials showed a change of –47.5% for dupilumab compared with –20.5% for placebo. The AD ADOL trial had a change of –47.9% compared with –19%, while the CHRONOS trial had a change of –57.3% compared with –30.9% (all P < .0001).

“These results support the role of dupilumab in improving itch outcomes associated with moderate to severe AD, starting with the first dose of treatment and providing long-term sustained control,” the authors wrote. by Rebecca L. Forand

 

Disclosures: Silverberg reports he has been an investigator for AbbVie, AnaptysBio, Arena, Asana, Boehringer Ingelheim, Dermira, Dermavant, DS Biopharma, Eli Lilly, Galderma, GlaxoSmithKline, Glenmark, Kiniksa, Leo Pharma, Novartis, Pfizer, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi; a consultant for AbbVie, Eli Lilly, Galderma, Galderma, Incyte, Kiniksa, Leo Pharma, Menlo Therapeutics, Pfizer, Realm, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi; and a speaker for Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.