Atopic dermatitis significantly impacts adults, AAD presenter reports

 

Jonathan Silverberg
Jonathan I. Silverberg

While atopic dermatitis is commonly diagnosed in infancy and early childhood, it can have a profound impact on adult patients, according to a presentation at the American Academy of Dermatology Summer Meeting in New York.

“Adult eczema patients may have dealt with their symptoms for their entire lives, which can be draining, or they may experience symptoms for the first time as adults, which can be a difficult adjustment,” Jonathan I. Silverberg, MD, PhD, MPH, FAAD, an assistant professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and director of the Northwestern Medicine Multidisciplinary Eczema Center in Chicago, stated in a news release. “Either way, this condition can take a real toll on them.”

According to Silverberg, who presented a session titled, “Atopic dermatitis in adults: not just big kids,” atopic dermatitis (AD) affects about half as many adults as it does children, and the prevalence in adults may be increasing, reflecting a recent increase the condition overall.

Silverberg reported that AD can have a significant impact on adults’ quality of life, making everyday tasks and routine activities difficult, affect work attendance and performance, disrupt sleep and contribute to anxiety and depression.

Additionally, patients might face stigma, especially when AD is in visible locations.

AD treatment may include moisturizers, topical steroids, phototherapy or systemic medications, and the FDA has approved two new treatment options for atopic dermatitis – an anti-inflammatory topical medication for mild to moderate AD and an injectable systemic drug for moderate-to-sever AD, Silverberg reported.

“This is an exciting time that offers a lot of hope and promise for people with eczema, both children and adults,” he stated in the release.

 

Reference: www.aad.org

Silverberg JI. FRM F008. Atopic dermatitis in adults: not just big kids. Presented at: American Academy of Dermatology Summer Meeting; July 28-30, New York.

Disclosure: Silverberg reports financial ties with AbbVie, Anacor Pharmaceuticals, Celgene Corporation, Eli Lilly and Company, Galderma Research & Development, LLC, GlaxoSmithKline, Hoffman-La Roche Ltd., Medimmune, Procter & Gamble Company, PuriCore and Regeneron.

 

Jonathan Silverberg
Jonathan I. Silverberg

While atopic dermatitis is commonly diagnosed in infancy and early childhood, it can have a profound impact on adult patients, according to a presentation at the American Academy of Dermatology Summer Meeting in New York.

“Adult eczema patients may have dealt with their symptoms for their entire lives, which can be draining, or they may experience symptoms for the first time as adults, which can be a difficult adjustment,” Jonathan I. Silverberg, MD, PhD, MPH, FAAD, an assistant professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and director of the Northwestern Medicine Multidisciplinary Eczema Center in Chicago, stated in a news release. “Either way, this condition can take a real toll on them.”

According to Silverberg, who presented a session titled, “Atopic dermatitis in adults: not just big kids,” atopic dermatitis (AD) affects about half as many adults as it does children, and the prevalence in adults may be increasing, reflecting a recent increase the condition overall.

Silverberg reported that AD can have a significant impact on adults’ quality of life, making everyday tasks and routine activities difficult, affect work attendance and performance, disrupt sleep and contribute to anxiety and depression.

Additionally, patients might face stigma, especially when AD is in visible locations.

AD treatment may include moisturizers, topical steroids, phototherapy or systemic medications, and the FDA has approved two new treatment options for atopic dermatitis – an anti-inflammatory topical medication for mild to moderate AD and an injectable systemic drug for moderate-to-sever AD, Silverberg reported.

“This is an exciting time that offers a lot of hope and promise for people with eczema, both children and adults,” he stated in the release.

 

Reference: www.aad.org

Silverberg JI. FRM F008. Atopic dermatitis in adults: not just big kids. Presented at: American Academy of Dermatology Summer Meeting; July 28-30, New York.

Disclosure: Silverberg reports financial ties with AbbVie, Anacor Pharmaceuticals, Celgene Corporation, Eli Lilly and Company, Galderma Research & Development, LLC, GlaxoSmithKline, Hoffman-La Roche Ltd., Medimmune, Procter & Gamble Company, PuriCore and Regeneron.