In the Journals

IBD associated with increased melanoma risk

Inflammatory bowel disease was associated with an increased risk for melanoma, regardless of biologic therapy use, according to recent study results.

Researchers used a systematic bibliographic database search through March 2013. The analysis included 12 cohort studies reporting incident melanoma following diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The random-effects model calculated pooled relative risk.

The studies included 172,837 patients with IBD, with 179 cases of melanoma reported from 1940 to 1979. Melanoma in patients with IBD had a pooled crude incidence rate of 27.5 cases per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 19.9-37). Overall, across 12 IBD studies, there was an increased relative risk for melanoma of 1.37 (95% CI, 1.10-1.70). The risk rose to 80% among patients with Crohn’s disease (7 studies; RR=1.80; 95% CI, 1.17-2.75), and patients in seven studies with ulcerative colitis had an RR of 1.23 (95% CI, 1.01-1.50).

In studies predating 1998 and before patients were treated with biologics, the risk for melanoma was greater (eight studies; RR=1.52; 95% CI, 1.02-2.25) compared with studies performed after 1998 (two studies; RR=1.08; 95% CI, 0.59-1.96).

Siddharth Singh, MD 

Siddharth Singh

“Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with a modest increase in the risk of melanoma, regardless of therapy,” researcher Siddharth Singh, MBBS, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., told Healio.com. “It is unclear whether individual medications, like anti-[tumor necrosis factor] agents or thiopurines significantly modify this risk of melanoma. Sun-protective measures and an annual skin exam should be recommended for all patients with IBD.”

Disclosure: Researcher Edward V. Loftus Jr., MD, has consulted for and received research support from Janssen Biotech, Abbott Laboratories and UCB Pharma.

Inflammatory bowel disease was associated with an increased risk for melanoma, regardless of biologic therapy use, according to recent study results.

Researchers used a systematic bibliographic database search through March 2013. The analysis included 12 cohort studies reporting incident melanoma following diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The random-effects model calculated pooled relative risk.

The studies included 172,837 patients with IBD, with 179 cases of melanoma reported from 1940 to 1979. Melanoma in patients with IBD had a pooled crude incidence rate of 27.5 cases per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 19.9-37). Overall, across 12 IBD studies, there was an increased relative risk for melanoma of 1.37 (95% CI, 1.10-1.70). The risk rose to 80% among patients with Crohn’s disease (7 studies; RR=1.80; 95% CI, 1.17-2.75), and patients in seven studies with ulcerative colitis had an RR of 1.23 (95% CI, 1.01-1.50).

In studies predating 1998 and before patients were treated with biologics, the risk for melanoma was greater (eight studies; RR=1.52; 95% CI, 1.02-2.25) compared with studies performed after 1998 (two studies; RR=1.08; 95% CI, 0.59-1.96).

Siddharth Singh, MD 

Siddharth Singh

“Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with a modest increase in the risk of melanoma, regardless of therapy,” researcher Siddharth Singh, MBBS, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., told Healio.com. “It is unclear whether individual medications, like anti-[tumor necrosis factor] agents or thiopurines significantly modify this risk of melanoma. Sun-protective measures and an annual skin exam should be recommended for all patients with IBD.”

Disclosure: Researcher Edward V. Loftus Jr., MD, has consulted for and received research support from Janssen Biotech, Abbott Laboratories and UCB Pharma.