In the Journals

Low rate of disease remission reported for vulval lichen planus

Among 11 patients with vulval lichen planus who achieved disease remission, nine were treated primarily by a dermatologist.

According to the abstract, the study was conducted in light of a lack of evidence-based guidelines to aid clinicians in treating this condition. Researchers retrospectively reviewed the clinical presentation and treatment information for 100 consecutive patients diagnosed at a single center between Jan. 1, 1997 and Dec. 31, 2015.

More than 1 year was reported as a time to diagnosis in 49% of the cohort. Vulval dysplasia, including invasive squamous cell carcinoma, occurred in 3% of the cohort. Multisite lichen planus disease was observed in 68% of patients.

The rate of disease remission was 11%. In nine of these disease remission cases, dermatology was the lead specialty.

Other findings indicated the duration from symptom onset to diagnosis was 12 months. Lichenoid infiltration at the dermoepidermal junction was noted as a critical diagnostic feature of vulval lichen planus, along with epidermal thickening.

Biopsy was necessary for diagnosis in two-thirds of the cohort. Multiple biopsies occurred in 27 patients.

Systemic medication was required in 43% of patients who failed to reach adequate disease control with topical therapies. Patient monitoring was a median of 24 months in 79% of the cohort.

“A low frequency of disease remission was seen in patients with VLP,” the researchers concluded. “Patients with lichen planus benefit considerably from dermatology consultation.” – by Rob Volansky

Disclosure s : The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Among 11 patients with vulval lichen planus who achieved disease remission, nine were treated primarily by a dermatologist.

According to the abstract, the study was conducted in light of a lack of evidence-based guidelines to aid clinicians in treating this condition. Researchers retrospectively reviewed the clinical presentation and treatment information for 100 consecutive patients diagnosed at a single center between Jan. 1, 1997 and Dec. 31, 2015.

More than 1 year was reported as a time to diagnosis in 49% of the cohort. Vulval dysplasia, including invasive squamous cell carcinoma, occurred in 3% of the cohort. Multisite lichen planus disease was observed in 68% of patients.

The rate of disease remission was 11%. In nine of these disease remission cases, dermatology was the lead specialty.

Other findings indicated the duration from symptom onset to diagnosis was 12 months. Lichenoid infiltration at the dermoepidermal junction was noted as a critical diagnostic feature of vulval lichen planus, along with epidermal thickening.

Biopsy was necessary for diagnosis in two-thirds of the cohort. Multiple biopsies occurred in 27 patients.

Systemic medication was required in 43% of patients who failed to reach adequate disease control with topical therapies. Patient monitoring was a median of 24 months in 79% of the cohort.

“A low frequency of disease remission was seen in patients with VLP,” the researchers concluded. “Patients with lichen planus benefit considerably from dermatology consultation.” – by Rob Volansky

Disclosure s : The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.