In the Journals

Hairdressers willing to learn more about skin cancer detection

Researchers found that 93% of hairdressers want to learn more about skin cancer detection as it pertains to their clients, according to findings in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

“Hairdressers have been considered a potential resource for skin cancer surveillance, and previous studies suggest that hairdressers are interested in skin cancer education. However, validation of these findings in other hairdresser communities are needed, and factors associated with receptiveness to skin cancer education are unknown,” David C. Gibbs, BS, of the department of epidemiology at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, and colleagues wrote.

Fifteen salons within a 30-mile radius of Emory University were selected at random to receive surveys. In total, 229 hairdressers from 12 salons completed the surveys. The questions were from previously published surveys on skin cancer examination behaviors and attitudes among hairdressers. Eighty-two percent of survey respondents were women, 58% were between the ages of 18 and 32 years, 86% were white, and 97% estimated that 50% or more of their customers were white.

The researchers found that 93% of the hairdressers wanted to learn more about skin cancer detection and examination through salon-held training sessions and videos; 73% of the respondents felt that hairdressers should be trained in skin cancer detection while 40% believed that training should be a requirement. Hairdressers who had a conversation with their clients about skin cancer were more than twice as likely to agree with detection training (OR = 2.21; 95% CI, 1.34-3.63). Fifty-four percent reported that they check their clients for skin lesions once a month, and 52% had previously referred their clients to a physician if they found an abnormal mole.

“Hairdressers are in a unique position to detect skin cancers given their routine contact with much of the public and their close observation of body sites where skin cancers commonly arise,” Gibbs and colleagues wrote. – by Alexandria Brooks

 

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Researchers found that 93% of hairdressers want to learn more about skin cancer detection as it pertains to their clients, according to findings in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

“Hairdressers have been considered a potential resource for skin cancer surveillance, and previous studies suggest that hairdressers are interested in skin cancer education. However, validation of these findings in other hairdresser communities are needed, and factors associated with receptiveness to skin cancer education are unknown,” David C. Gibbs, BS, of the department of epidemiology at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, and colleagues wrote.

Fifteen salons within a 30-mile radius of Emory University were selected at random to receive surveys. In total, 229 hairdressers from 12 salons completed the surveys. The questions were from previously published surveys on skin cancer examination behaviors and attitudes among hairdressers. Eighty-two percent of survey respondents were women, 58% were between the ages of 18 and 32 years, 86% were white, and 97% estimated that 50% or more of their customers were white.

The researchers found that 93% of the hairdressers wanted to learn more about skin cancer detection and examination through salon-held training sessions and videos; 73% of the respondents felt that hairdressers should be trained in skin cancer detection while 40% believed that training should be a requirement. Hairdressers who had a conversation with their clients about skin cancer were more than twice as likely to agree with detection training (OR = 2.21; 95% CI, 1.34-3.63). Fifty-four percent reported that they check their clients for skin lesions once a month, and 52% had previously referred their clients to a physician if they found an abnormal mole.

“Hairdressers are in a unique position to detect skin cancers given their routine contact with much of the public and their close observation of body sites where skin cancers commonly arise,” Gibbs and colleagues wrote. – by Alexandria Brooks

 

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.