In the Journals

Particle traps benefited CV health in men exposed to diesel exhaust

Exhaust particle traps, which are used to reduce particle emissions from diesel engines, are not only beneficial to the environment but may even confer a health benefit by reducing CV events among those exposed to the exhaust, a new study suggested.

“There is a robust and consistent association between air pollution and CV morbidity and mortality,” the researchers wrote. “Using complementary and relevant measures of CV health, we have reconfirmed the adverse effects of exposure to diesel engine exhaust on endothelial function and ex vivo thrombosis.”

The randomized, double blind study involved 19 healthy male volunteers (mean age, 25 years). Researchers used an exposure facility led by technical staff to expose participants for 1 hour to filtered air and diesel exhaust in either the presence or absence of a particle trap. Investigators then measured forearm blood flow and plasma fibrinolytic factors and assessed ex vivo thrombus formation.

They found that diesel exhaust compared with filtered air correlated with increased ex vivo thrombus formation and reduced vasodilatation under both low- and high-shear conditions. Overall, diesel exhaust particulate number and mass were substantially reduced with the particle trap (P<.001 for both), which resulted in reduced thrombus formation, increased vasodilatation and an increase in tissue-type plasminogen activator release.

This led the researchers to conclude by supporting the application of particle traps to diesel-powered vehicles for reducing urban particulate concentrations, as well as limiting a range of adverse CV effects related to exposure to traffic-derived air pollution.

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Exhaust particle traps, which are used to reduce particle emissions from diesel engines, are not only beneficial to the environment but may even confer a health benefit by reducing CV events among those exposed to the exhaust, a new study suggested.

“There is a robust and consistent association between air pollution and CV morbidity and mortality,” the researchers wrote. “Using complementary and relevant measures of CV health, we have reconfirmed the adverse effects of exposure to diesel engine exhaust on endothelial function and ex vivo thrombosis.”

The randomized, double blind study involved 19 healthy male volunteers (mean age, 25 years). Researchers used an exposure facility led by technical staff to expose participants for 1 hour to filtered air and diesel exhaust in either the presence or absence of a particle trap. Investigators then measured forearm blood flow and plasma fibrinolytic factors and assessed ex vivo thrombus formation.

They found that diesel exhaust compared with filtered air correlated with increased ex vivo thrombus formation and reduced vasodilatation under both low- and high-shear conditions. Overall, diesel exhaust particulate number and mass were substantially reduced with the particle trap (P<.001 for both), which resulted in reduced thrombus formation, increased vasodilatation and an increase in tissue-type plasminogen activator release.

This led the researchers to conclude by supporting the application of particle traps to diesel-powered vehicles for reducing urban particulate concentrations, as well as limiting a range of adverse CV effects related to exposure to traffic-derived air pollution.

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