Meeting News

High BP reasons differ by sex in young adults

The factors that drive high BP differ among men and woman aged 36 to 65 years, suggesting a need for sex-specific treatments, according to findings presented at the American Heart Association Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions.

“The key takeaway from this study is that, for young and middle-aged women, stroke volume was the main determinant of blood pressure, while, in men, vascular resistance was the main determinant of blood pressure,” Catriona Syme, PhD, postdoctoral fellow at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, said in a press release.

Syme and colleagues used data from the Saguenay Youth Study, which included 911 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years (52% female) and 426 adults aged 36 to 65 years (56% women) from Canada. The researchers measured BP and heart rate, stroke volume and total peripheral resistance at rest, during posture changes and during a mental stressor.

Among females, stroke volume explained 55% of the variance in systolic BP compared with 35% of variance in males.

Among males, total peripheral resistance explained 47% of the variance compared with 30% in females.

The sex differences were seen across the different activities.

The sex differences were similar in adolescents but less pronounced, being only significant during standing BP.

“We think premenopausal women and men of a similar age may have elevated blood pressure for different reasons, and thus may need to be treated for hypertension differently,” Syme said. “After menopause, when the production of female sex hormones decreases, reasons for hypertension may be more similar in men and women.” – by Cassie Homer

Reference:

Syme C, et al. Abstract 44. Presented at: AHA Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions; Sept. 14-17, 2017; San Francisco.

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

The factors that drive high BP differ among men and woman aged 36 to 65 years, suggesting a need for sex-specific treatments, according to findings presented at the American Heart Association Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions.

“The key takeaway from this study is that, for young and middle-aged women, stroke volume was the main determinant of blood pressure, while, in men, vascular resistance was the main determinant of blood pressure,” Catriona Syme, PhD, postdoctoral fellow at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, said in a press release.

Syme and colleagues used data from the Saguenay Youth Study, which included 911 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years (52% female) and 426 adults aged 36 to 65 years (56% women) from Canada. The researchers measured BP and heart rate, stroke volume and total peripheral resistance at rest, during posture changes and during a mental stressor.

Among females, stroke volume explained 55% of the variance in systolic BP compared with 35% of variance in males.

Among males, total peripheral resistance explained 47% of the variance compared with 30% in females.

The sex differences were seen across the different activities.

The sex differences were similar in adolescents but less pronounced, being only significant during standing BP.

“We think premenopausal women and men of a similar age may have elevated blood pressure for different reasons, and thus may need to be treated for hypertension differently,” Syme said. “After menopause, when the production of female sex hormones decreases, reasons for hypertension may be more similar in men and women.” – by Cassie Homer

Reference:

Syme C, et al. Abstract 44. Presented at: AHA Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions; Sept. 14-17, 2017; San Francisco.

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.