In the Journals

E-cigarette use increases risk for MI

Patients who smoked electronic cigarettes every day or some days had an increased risk for MI, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Dharma N. Bhatta, PhD, MPH, postdoctoral scholar at the Cardiovascular Research Institute, School of Medicine at University of California, San Francisco, and Stanton A. Glantz, PhD, professor of medicine School of Medicine at University of California, San Francisco, analyzed data from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) wave 1 (n = 32,320) and wave 2 (n = 28,362). Participants were asked whether a health professional has every told them that they had an MI, in addition to other questions focused on high BP, high cholesterol and diabetes.

Participants were also categorized based on their response to questions regarding e-cigarette and combustible cigarette use: every-day smokers, some-day smokers, former smokers and never smokers.

Increased odds for MI were seen in participants who were every-day (adjusted OR = 2.25; 95% CI, 1.23-4.11) and some-day e-cigarette users (aOR = 1.99; 95% CI, 1.11-3.58), both of which had a significant dose response (P < .0005).

Compared with participants who never smoked cigarettes or used e-cigarettes, those who used both types of cigarettes had an OR of 6.64 for having an MI.

MIs that occurred during wave 1 of the study were not predictors of e-cigarette use in wave 2 (P > .62), which suggested that reverse causality did not explain the cross-sectional link between e-cigarette use and MI during wave 1, according to the study.

Patients who smoked electronic cigarettes every day or some days had an increased risk for MI, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
Source: Adobe Stock

“E-cigarettes should not be promoted or prescribed as a less risky alternative to combustible cigarettes and should not be recommended for smoking cessation among people with or at risk of myocardial infarction,” Bhatta and Glantz wrote. – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Patients who smoked electronic cigarettes every day or some days had an increased risk for MI, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Dharma N. Bhatta, PhD, MPH, postdoctoral scholar at the Cardiovascular Research Institute, School of Medicine at University of California, San Francisco, and Stanton A. Glantz, PhD, professor of medicine School of Medicine at University of California, San Francisco, analyzed data from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) wave 1 (n = 32,320) and wave 2 (n = 28,362). Participants were asked whether a health professional has every told them that they had an MI, in addition to other questions focused on high BP, high cholesterol and diabetes.

Participants were also categorized based on their response to questions regarding e-cigarette and combustible cigarette use: every-day smokers, some-day smokers, former smokers and never smokers.

Increased odds for MI were seen in participants who were every-day (adjusted OR = 2.25; 95% CI, 1.23-4.11) and some-day e-cigarette users (aOR = 1.99; 95% CI, 1.11-3.58), both of which had a significant dose response (P < .0005).

Compared with participants who never smoked cigarettes or used e-cigarettes, those who used both types of cigarettes had an OR of 6.64 for having an MI.

MIs that occurred during wave 1 of the study were not predictors of e-cigarette use in wave 2 (P > .62), which suggested that reverse causality did not explain the cross-sectional link between e-cigarette use and MI during wave 1, according to the study.

Patients who smoked electronic cigarettes every day or some days had an increased risk for MI, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
Source: Adobe Stock

“E-cigarettes should not be promoted or prescribed as a less risky alternative to combustible cigarettes and should not be recommended for smoking cessation among people with or at risk of myocardial infarction,” Bhatta and Glantz wrote. – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

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