In the Journals

Preterm birth may increase hypertension risk in women

Daniel W. Jones
Daniel W. Jones

Young women who were born preterm were more likely to have elevated systolic BP and an increased risk for hypertension compared with women who were born at term or post-term, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“There is now overwhelming evidence showing that preterm birth is a risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases later in life,” José G.B. Derraik, BSc, MSc, PhD, MRSNZ, senior research fellow at Liggins Institute at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, told Cardiology Today. “As with many conditions, we can offset the risks with a healthy diet, regular exercise and both adequate and regular sleep. This new understanding means health professionals can help people born preterm to stay well by encouraging and supporting them to make healthier lifestyle choices.”

Women military volunteers

Loren Skudder-Hill, of the Jiangsu University School of Clinical Medicine in Zhenjiang, China, and colleagues analyzed data from 5,232 young adult women (mean age, 18 years) who volunteered for military service in Sweden between 1990 and 2007. Women underwent a physical examination when enrolling in military service, where data including clinic and anthropometric BP were collected. Data from the Swedish Birth Register were also assessed.

José G.B. Derraik
José G.B. Derraik

Of the women in the study, 5.7% were born preterm, defined as less than 37 weeks of gestation. There were progressive declines in systolic BP, diastolic BP and mean arterial pressure as gestational age increased.

Compared with young women born at term, those born preterm had an adjusted increase in systolic BP of 3.8 mm Hg (95% CI, 2.5-5.1) and in mean arterial pressure of 1.9 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.9-2.8).

Young women born preterm had higher rates of systolic hypertension (14% vs. 8.1%; P < .0001) and isolated systolic hypertension compared with those born at term or post-term. Women born preterm had 1.72 times higher RR for systolic hypertension vs. those born at term or post-term (95% CI, 1.26-2.34). There were no differences between both groups for diastolic hypertension (adjusted RR = 1.6; 95% CI, 0.49-5.2).

Young women who were born preterm were more likely to have elevated systolic BP and an increased risk for hypertension compared with women who were born at term or post-term, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
Source: Adobe Stock

“Importantly, future research should examine the potential effects of early interventions in those born preterm regarding, for example, the possible long-term benefits of increasing physical activity and dietary changes,” Derraik said in an interview. “Of note, the authors of the editorial published alongside our study in JAHA mentioned that even the early use of pharmacotherapy should be considered. As a result, it is important to identify the best preventative approaches in this population regarding both compliance and long-term benefits.”

BP measurements

“Clinicians caring for children, adolescents and young adults who have a history of preterm birth should pay careful attention to BP measurement and monitoring renal function,” Daniel W. Jones, MD, director of clinical and population sciences at the Mississippi Center for Obesity Research, Mr. and Mrs. Joe F. Sanderson Jr. Endowed Chair in obesity, metabolic diseases and nutrition and professor of medicine and physiology at the University of Mississippi School of Medicine in Jackson, and colleagues wrote in a related editorial. “Effective use of office BP measurement, home measurement and ambulatory BP measurement is especially important in these high-risk patients.” – by Darlene Dobkowski

For more information:

José G.B. Derraik, BSc, MSc, PhD, MRSNZ, can be reached at Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand; e-mail: j.derraik@auckland.ac.nz; Twitter: @jderraik.

Disclosures: The authors of the study and editorial report no relevant financial disclosures.

 

Daniel W. Jones
Daniel W. Jones

Young women who were born preterm were more likely to have elevated systolic BP and an increased risk for hypertension compared with women who were born at term or post-term, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“There is now overwhelming evidence showing that preterm birth is a risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases later in life,” José G.B. Derraik, BSc, MSc, PhD, MRSNZ, senior research fellow at Liggins Institute at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, told Cardiology Today. “As with many conditions, we can offset the risks with a healthy diet, regular exercise and both adequate and regular sleep. This new understanding means health professionals can help people born preterm to stay well by encouraging and supporting them to make healthier lifestyle choices.”

Women military volunteers

Loren Skudder-Hill, of the Jiangsu University School of Clinical Medicine in Zhenjiang, China, and colleagues analyzed data from 5,232 young adult women (mean age, 18 years) who volunteered for military service in Sweden between 1990 and 2007. Women underwent a physical examination when enrolling in military service, where data including clinic and anthropometric BP were collected. Data from the Swedish Birth Register were also assessed.

José G.B. Derraik
José G.B. Derraik

Of the women in the study, 5.7% were born preterm, defined as less than 37 weeks of gestation. There were progressive declines in systolic BP, diastolic BP and mean arterial pressure as gestational age increased.

Compared with young women born at term, those born preterm had an adjusted increase in systolic BP of 3.8 mm Hg (95% CI, 2.5-5.1) and in mean arterial pressure of 1.9 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.9-2.8).

Young women born preterm had higher rates of systolic hypertension (14% vs. 8.1%; P < .0001) and isolated systolic hypertension compared with those born at term or post-term. Women born preterm had 1.72 times higher RR for systolic hypertension vs. those born at term or post-term (95% CI, 1.26-2.34). There were no differences between both groups for diastolic hypertension (adjusted RR = 1.6; 95% CI, 0.49-5.2).

Young women who were born preterm were more likely to have elevated systolic BP and an increased risk for hypertension compared with women who were born at term or post-term, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
Source: Adobe Stock

“Importantly, future research should examine the potential effects of early interventions in those born preterm regarding, for example, the possible long-term benefits of increasing physical activity and dietary changes,” Derraik said in an interview. “Of note, the authors of the editorial published alongside our study in JAHA mentioned that even the early use of pharmacotherapy should be considered. As a result, it is important to identify the best preventative approaches in this population regarding both compliance and long-term benefits.”

BP measurements

“Clinicians caring for children, adolescents and young adults who have a history of preterm birth should pay careful attention to BP measurement and monitoring renal function,” Daniel W. Jones, MD, director of clinical and population sciences at the Mississippi Center for Obesity Research, Mr. and Mrs. Joe F. Sanderson Jr. Endowed Chair in obesity, metabolic diseases and nutrition and professor of medicine and physiology at the University of Mississippi School of Medicine in Jackson, and colleagues wrote in a related editorial. “Effective use of office BP measurement, home measurement and ambulatory BP measurement is especially important in these high-risk patients.” – by Darlene Dobkowski

For more information:

José G.B. Derraik, BSc, MSc, PhD, MRSNZ, can be reached at Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand; e-mail: j.derraik@auckland.ac.nz; Twitter: @jderraik.

Disclosures: The authors of the study and editorial report no relevant financial disclosures.