Meeting News

BP regimens, depression screening in ACS highlight ACC vascular medicine content

NEW ORLEANS — Two studies of the potential benefits of certain BP regimens in specific populations, an assessment of whether depression screening improves quality of life after ACS and the possible ability of the influenza vaccine to prevent MI were among the vascular medicine-related topics presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session. Read more for a list of highlights from Cardiology Today’s coverage.

Intensive BP therapy reduces white matter hyperintensity in elderly

NEW ORLEANS — In the INFINITY trial, intensive therapy to target 24-hour ambulatory systolic BP of 130 mm Hg resulted in significantly reduced accrual of subcortical white matter intensity over 3 years compared with standard BP management in elderly patients with hypertension.

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Combination therapy with amlodipine effective in sub-Saharan black adults
NEW ORLEANS — A combination of amlodipine and one of hydrochlorothiazide or perindopril showed efficacy in treating hypertension in black adults in sub-Saharan Africa compared with a hydrochlorothiazide-perindopril, according to findings presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

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CODIACS-QoL: Depression screening fails to improve quality of life post-ACS

NEW ORLEANS — Patients with ACS who were screened for depression either with or without provision of depression treatment after screening positive did not have a change in depressive symptoms or quality-adjusted life-years at 18-month follow-up, according to data from the CODIACS-QoL trial presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

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LV end-systolic dimension predicts mortality in aortic regurgitation

NEW ORLEANS — Along with symptomatic status, elevated indexed left ventricular end-systolic dimension predicted mortality in patients with moderate to severe or severe aortic regurgitation but no CAD, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

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Two studies of the potential benefits of certain BP regimens in specific populations, an assessment of whether depression screening improves quality of life after ACS and the possible ability of the influenza vaccine to prevent MI were among the vascular medicine-related topics presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.
Source: Adobe Stock

Flu vaccination in hospital cut risk for heart attack

NEW ORLEANS — In a new study of nearly 30 million hospital records, adults who were vaccinated for influenza while hospitalized had a 10% lower risk for MI that year compared with adults who did not receive a vaccination while hospitalized, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

Read More

Link between atherosclerosis, erectile dysfunction strengthened in imaging study

NEW ORLEANS — An advanced imaging study using fluorine-18 sodium fluoride PET determined that there is a relationship between atherosclerosis and erectile dysfunction, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

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Type 2 MI: Cardiac rehab referrals, attendance low

NEW ORLEANS — Patients with type 2 MI are not only rarely referred to cardiac rehabilitation, but they are even less likely to attend.

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Early discharge, home treatment with rivaroxaban promising in low-risk pulmonary embolism

NEW ORLEANS — Certain patients with acute low-risk pulmonary embolism fared well with early discharge and home treatment with rivaroxaban, according to new data from the HoT-PE study.

Read More

Midday naps lower BP in patients with hypertension

NEW ORLEANS — Among patients with arterial hypertension, those who napped in midday had lower BP compared with those who did not take a nap, independent of dipping status, according to findings presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

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LV hypertrophy may be common in former NFL players

NEW ORLEANS — Some former professional football players continued to have left ventricular hypertrophy regardless of the amount of time that they were detrained, according to data presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

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NEW ORLEANS — Two studies of the potential benefits of certain BP regimens in specific populations, an assessment of whether depression screening improves quality of life after ACS and the possible ability of the influenza vaccine to prevent MI were among the vascular medicine-related topics presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session. Read more for a list of highlights from Cardiology Today’s coverage.

Intensive BP therapy reduces white matter hyperintensity in elderly

NEW ORLEANS — In the INFINITY trial, intensive therapy to target 24-hour ambulatory systolic BP of 130 mm Hg resulted in significantly reduced accrual of subcortical white matter intensity over 3 years compared with standard BP management in elderly patients with hypertension.

Read More

Combination therapy with amlodipine effective in sub-Saharan black adults
NEW ORLEANS — A combination of amlodipine and one of hydrochlorothiazide or perindopril showed efficacy in treating hypertension in black adults in sub-Saharan Africa compared with a hydrochlorothiazide-perindopril, according to findings presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

Read More

CODIACS-QoL: Depression screening fails to improve quality of life post-ACS

NEW ORLEANS — Patients with ACS who were screened for depression either with or without provision of depression treatment after screening positive did not have a change in depressive symptoms or quality-adjusted life-years at 18-month follow-up, according to data from the CODIACS-QoL trial presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

Read More

LV end-systolic dimension predicts mortality in aortic regurgitation

NEW ORLEANS — Along with symptomatic status, elevated indexed left ventricular end-systolic dimension predicted mortality in patients with moderate to severe or severe aortic regurgitation but no CAD, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

Read More

Two studies of the potential benefits of certain BP regimens in specific populations, an assessment of whether depression screening improves quality of life after ACS and the possible ability of the influenza vaccine to prevent MI were among the vascular medicine-related topics presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.
Source: Adobe Stock

Flu vaccination in hospital cut risk for heart attack

NEW ORLEANS — In a new study of nearly 30 million hospital records, adults who were vaccinated for influenza while hospitalized had a 10% lower risk for MI that year compared with adults who did not receive a vaccination while hospitalized, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

Read More

Link between atherosclerosis, erectile dysfunction strengthened in imaging study

NEW ORLEANS — An advanced imaging study using fluorine-18 sodium fluoride PET determined that there is a relationship between atherosclerosis and erectile dysfunction, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

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Read More

Type 2 MI: Cardiac rehab referrals, attendance low

NEW ORLEANS — Patients with type 2 MI are not only rarely referred to cardiac rehabilitation, but they are even less likely to attend.

Read More

Early discharge, home treatment with rivaroxaban promising in low-risk pulmonary embolism

NEW ORLEANS — Certain patients with acute low-risk pulmonary embolism fared well with early discharge and home treatment with rivaroxaban, according to new data from the HoT-PE study.

Read More

Midday naps lower BP in patients with hypertension

NEW ORLEANS — Among patients with arterial hypertension, those who napped in midday had lower BP compared with those who did not take a nap, independent of dipping status, according to findings presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

Read More

LV hypertrophy may be common in former NFL players

NEW ORLEANS — Some former professional football players continued to have left ventricular hypertrophy regardless of the amount of time that they were detrained, according to data presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

Read More

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