FDA News

FDA approves angiotensin II to treat hypotension in shock

La Jolla Pharmaceutical Company announced that angiotensin II to increase BP in patients with septic or other distributive shock has been approved by the FDA.

The injection (Giapreza, La Jolla) will be available for patients in the United States in March 2018, according to a press release from the company.

“Vasopressors are critical to treat patients with shock,” John A. Kellum, MD, director of the Center for Critical Care Nephrology, vice chair for research and professor of critical care medicine at the University of Pittsburgh, said in the press release. “The critical care community now has another tool to use. The approval of angiotensin II represents a major advance in the treatment of patients with septic or distributive shock.”

As Cardiology Today previously reported, results from the ATHOS-3 study showed the effectiveness of angiotensin II in patients with vasodilatory shock who did not respond to conventional high-dose vasopressors. BP increased more in patients assigned angiotensin II compared with placebo.

Prophylactic treatment should be used with angiotensin II, as it may cause blood clots that lead to deep vein thrombosis, according to a press release from the FDA.

Disclosure: Kellum reports serving as an investigator on a study funded by La Jolla Pharmaceutical.

La Jolla Pharmaceutical Company announced that angiotensin II to increase BP in patients with septic or other distributive shock has been approved by the FDA.

The injection (Giapreza, La Jolla) will be available for patients in the United States in March 2018, according to a press release from the company.

“Vasopressors are critical to treat patients with shock,” John A. Kellum, MD, director of the Center for Critical Care Nephrology, vice chair for research and professor of critical care medicine at the University of Pittsburgh, said in the press release. “The critical care community now has another tool to use. The approval of angiotensin II represents a major advance in the treatment of patients with septic or distributive shock.”

As Cardiology Today previously reported, results from the ATHOS-3 study showed the effectiveness of angiotensin II in patients with vasodilatory shock who did not respond to conventional high-dose vasopressors. BP increased more in patients assigned angiotensin II compared with placebo.

Prophylactic treatment should be used with angiotensin II, as it may cause blood clots that lead to deep vein thrombosis, according to a press release from the FDA.

Disclosure: Kellum reports serving as an investigator on a study funded by La Jolla Pharmaceutical.