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Pulmonary hypertension increases risk for 30-day readmission

Manyoo Agarwal
Manyoo Agarwal

CHICAGO — Patients with pulmonary hypertension were more likely to have 30-day hospital readmissions, both overall and related to congestive HF, according to data presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

“Our study from a large real-world unselected dataset indicates that patients with a discharge diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension are at higher risk for 30-day hospital readmissions when compared with those without pulmonary hypertension,” Manyoo Agarwal, MD, chief resident of internal medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine in Memphis, told Cardiology Today.

Researchers analyzed data from 16,744,844 patients from the U.S. Nationwide Readmissions Database hospitalized from 2013 to 2014. The association between HF readmissions and pulmonary hypertension was also assessed in patients with congestive HF (n = 967,983) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 1,390,383).

The primary outcomes were all-cause and congestive HF-related 30-day hospital readmission.

Of the study cohort, 2.4% of patients had pulmonary hypertension. At 30 days, all-cause hospital readmission occurred in 9.9% of patients.

Patients with pulmonary hypertension were more likely to be readmitted compared with those without pulmonary hypertension (18.3% vs. 9.7%; adjusted OR = 1.14; 95% CI, 1.13-1.15).

Congestive HF was the 30-day hospital readmission diagnosis for 74,876 patients. Of these patients, those with pulmonary hypertension were more likely to achieve the endpoint vs. those without pulmonary hypertension (16% vs. 4%; aOR = 2.23; 95% CI, 2.18-2.28).

Results were similar when stratified by history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or congestive HF.

“This is a high-risk population,” Agarwal said in an interview. “There needs to be more research initiatives to better understand what’s the pathophysiology behind these outcomes.” – by Darlene Dobkowski

Reference:

Agarwal M, et al. Poster Mo1285. Presented at: American Heart Association Scientific Sessions; Nov. 10-12, 2018; Chicago.

Disclosure: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Manyoo Agarwal
Manyoo Agarwal

CHICAGO — Patients with pulmonary hypertension were more likely to have 30-day hospital readmissions, both overall and related to congestive HF, according to data presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

“Our study from a large real-world unselected dataset indicates that patients with a discharge diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension are at higher risk for 30-day hospital readmissions when compared with those without pulmonary hypertension,” Manyoo Agarwal, MD, chief resident of internal medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine in Memphis, told Cardiology Today.

Researchers analyzed data from 16,744,844 patients from the U.S. Nationwide Readmissions Database hospitalized from 2013 to 2014. The association between HF readmissions and pulmonary hypertension was also assessed in patients with congestive HF (n = 967,983) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 1,390,383).

The primary outcomes were all-cause and congestive HF-related 30-day hospital readmission.

Of the study cohort, 2.4% of patients had pulmonary hypertension. At 30 days, all-cause hospital readmission occurred in 9.9% of patients.

Patients with pulmonary hypertension were more likely to be readmitted compared with those without pulmonary hypertension (18.3% vs. 9.7%; adjusted OR = 1.14; 95% CI, 1.13-1.15).

Congestive HF was the 30-day hospital readmission diagnosis for 74,876 patients. Of these patients, those with pulmonary hypertension were more likely to achieve the endpoint vs. those without pulmonary hypertension (16% vs. 4%; aOR = 2.23; 95% CI, 2.18-2.28).

Results were similar when stratified by history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or congestive HF.

“This is a high-risk population,” Agarwal said in an interview. “There needs to be more research initiatives to better understand what’s the pathophysiology behind these outcomes.” – by Darlene Dobkowski

Reference:

Agarwal M, et al. Poster Mo1285. Presented at: American Heart Association Scientific Sessions; Nov. 10-12, 2018; Chicago.

Disclosure: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

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