In the Journals

Statins reduce stroke risk after radiation for cancer

Patients with cancer who took statins after undergoing radiotherapy to the head, neck and thorax had a significant reduction in stroke, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Our study demonstrated that statin therapy could be favorable even with the competing risks of cancer and cancer-related mortality in patients who received radiation therapy,” Negareh Mousavi, MD, MHSc, associate investigator at the Centre for Innovative Medicine and assistant professor in the department of medicine at McGill University in Montreal, said in a press release. “No other agent is recommended with enough evidence to reduce the risk of vascular events among cancer patients receiving radiation to the head, neck or chest.”

Jacinthe Boulet, MD, CM, of the department of internal medicine at McGill University Health Centre, and colleagues analyzed data from 5,718 patients older than 65 years with thorax and head or neck cancer who underwent radiotherapy. Demographic data collected at baseline included medical comorbidities, diagnosis and age on entry into the cohort. Patients were categorized by whether they took statins (n = 4,166; mean age, 75 years; 43% women) or not (n = 1,552; mean age, 76 years; 51% women).

The primary outcome of interest was the occurrence of CV or cerebrovascular events. The secondary outcome of interest was stroke. The mean time to event/censoring in the statin group was 594 days vs. 534 days in the nonstatin group.

The crude event rate for CV or cerebrovascular events was 10.3% in patients who did not take statins vs. 9% in those who took the therapy (HR = 0.92; 95% CI, 0.76-1.1).

Patients with cancer who took statins after undergoing radiotherapy to the head, neck and thorax had a significant reduction in stroke, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
Source: Adobe Stock

Statin therapy after undergoing radiotherapy was linked to a nonsignificant 15% RR reduction with a trend toward reducing CV and cerebrovascular events after adjusting for sex, age, diabetes, prior history of stroke/transient ischemic attack or MI, atrial fibrillation, dyslipidemia, HF, chronic kidney disease and hypertension. (HR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.69-1.04).

The outcome of stroke alone decreased by 32% with statin therapy (HR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.48-0.98).

“There is a need for prospective randomized control trials to explore the role of statins post-[radiation therapy] in less selected populations and to establish more definitive guidelines on the management of radiation-induced vascular disease,” Boulet and colleagues wrote. – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Patients with cancer who took statins after undergoing radiotherapy to the head, neck and thorax had a significant reduction in stroke, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Our study demonstrated that statin therapy could be favorable even with the competing risks of cancer and cancer-related mortality in patients who received radiation therapy,” Negareh Mousavi, MD, MHSc, associate investigator at the Centre for Innovative Medicine and assistant professor in the department of medicine at McGill University in Montreal, said in a press release. “No other agent is recommended with enough evidence to reduce the risk of vascular events among cancer patients receiving radiation to the head, neck or chest.”

Jacinthe Boulet, MD, CM, of the department of internal medicine at McGill University Health Centre, and colleagues analyzed data from 5,718 patients older than 65 years with thorax and head or neck cancer who underwent radiotherapy. Demographic data collected at baseline included medical comorbidities, diagnosis and age on entry into the cohort. Patients were categorized by whether they took statins (n = 4,166; mean age, 75 years; 43% women) or not (n = 1,552; mean age, 76 years; 51% women).

The primary outcome of interest was the occurrence of CV or cerebrovascular events. The secondary outcome of interest was stroke. The mean time to event/censoring in the statin group was 594 days vs. 534 days in the nonstatin group.

The crude event rate for CV or cerebrovascular events was 10.3% in patients who did not take statins vs. 9% in those who took the therapy (HR = 0.92; 95% CI, 0.76-1.1).

Patients with cancer who took statins after undergoing radiotherapy to the head, neck and thorax had a significant reduction in stroke, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
Source: Adobe Stock

Statin therapy after undergoing radiotherapy was linked to a nonsignificant 15% RR reduction with a trend toward reducing CV and cerebrovascular events after adjusting for sex, age, diabetes, prior history of stroke/transient ischemic attack or MI, atrial fibrillation, dyslipidemia, HF, chronic kidney disease and hypertension. (HR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.69-1.04).

The outcome of stroke alone decreased by 32% with statin therapy (HR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.48-0.98).

“There is a need for prospective randomized control trials to explore the role of statins post-[radiation therapy] in less selected populations and to establish more definitive guidelines on the management of radiation-induced vascular disease,” Boulet and colleagues wrote. – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.