Meeting News

Incidence of stroke elevated over time in black adults

Black adults have a substantially higher incidence of stroke compared with white adults, without a significant change in disparity over time, according to data presented at the International Stroke Conference.

Dawn O. Kleindorfer, MD, professor and division director of cerebrovascular disease at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and colleagues sought to identify recent temporal trends and racial disparities in stroke incidence within a large, biracial population — five counties in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky region — using data from 2010 to 2015.

The researchers identified data from all hospitalized strokes from July 1993 to June 1994, and calendar years 1999, 2005, 2010 and preliminary data from 2015.

The denominator for the calculation of incidence rates in patients aged 20 years or older was estimated from U.S. census data, Kleindorfer and colleagues wrote in an abstract.

Incidence rates were age-, sex- and race-adjusted and were calculated assuming a Poisson distribution and standardized to the 2010 U.S. population, the researchers wrote.

According to Kleindorfer and colleagues, stroke incidence did not significantly change in 2015 compared with 2010, nor did the discrepancy in stroke incidence between black and white adults.

In 2010, the incidence of stroke was 310 (95% CI, 279-341) per 100,000 people in black adults and 184 (95% CI, 175-193) per 100,000 people in white adults (P < .05), whereas in 2015, it was 306 (95% CI, 277-334) per 100,000 people in black adults and 172 (95% CI, 164-181) in white adults (P < .05), Kleindorfer and colleagues wrote.

The findings were consistent across stroke subtypes, according to the researchers.

“This may be due to stabilization of rates over time, or less statistical power to detect smaller declines,” the researchers wrote. – by Earl Holland Jr.

Reference:

Kleindorfer DO, et al. MP58. Presented at: International Stroke Conference; Feb. 6-8, 2019; Honolulu.

Disclosure: Kleindorfer reports no relevant financial disclosures.

Black adults have a substantially higher incidence of stroke compared with white adults, without a significant change in disparity over time, according to data presented at the International Stroke Conference.

Dawn O. Kleindorfer, MD, professor and division director of cerebrovascular disease at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and colleagues sought to identify recent temporal trends and racial disparities in stroke incidence within a large, biracial population — five counties in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky region — using data from 2010 to 2015.

The researchers identified data from all hospitalized strokes from July 1993 to June 1994, and calendar years 1999, 2005, 2010 and preliminary data from 2015.

The denominator for the calculation of incidence rates in patients aged 20 years or older was estimated from U.S. census data, Kleindorfer and colleagues wrote in an abstract.

Incidence rates were age-, sex- and race-adjusted and were calculated assuming a Poisson distribution and standardized to the 2010 U.S. population, the researchers wrote.

According to Kleindorfer and colleagues, stroke incidence did not significantly change in 2015 compared with 2010, nor did the discrepancy in stroke incidence between black and white adults.

In 2010, the incidence of stroke was 310 (95% CI, 279-341) per 100,000 people in black adults and 184 (95% CI, 175-193) per 100,000 people in white adults (P < .05), whereas in 2015, it was 306 (95% CI, 277-334) per 100,000 people in black adults and 172 (95% CI, 164-181) in white adults (P < .05), Kleindorfer and colleagues wrote.

The findings were consistent across stroke subtypes, according to the researchers.

“This may be due to stabilization of rates over time, or less statistical power to detect smaller declines,” the researchers wrote. – by Earl Holland Jr.

Reference:

Kleindorfer DO, et al. MP58. Presented at: International Stroke Conference; Feb. 6-8, 2019; Honolulu.

Disclosure: Kleindorfer reports no relevant financial disclosures.