Meeting News Coverage

Radial access for PCI after STEMI lowered risk for bleeding, transfusion

LAS VEGAS — Patients who underwent PCI after STEMI had lower rates of bleeding and blood transfusion if the procedure was performed via transradial access compared with transfemoral access, according to data presented at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Scientific Sessions.

Researchers also reported that the use of transradial access increased from January 2010 to June 2013, albeit at a lower rate for patients with STEMI than for other patients.

Michael Howe, MD, from the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center, and colleagues analyzed patients who underwent PCI at 44 hospitals from the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium from 2010 to 2013. The cohort included 108,060 PCI procedures, 13.7% of which were performed in patients with STEMI.

Michael Howe, MD

Michael Howe

Among those with STEMI, 6.72% underwent PCI via transradial access during the study period, Howe reported. The rate of adoption of transradial access for patients undergoing PCI after STEMI (January 2010, <1%; June 2013, 14.2%; slope, 1.09% per quarter) was slower than that for patients undergoing PCI for other reasons (January 2010, 2.2%; June 2013, 27.5%; slope, 2.04% per quarter; P<.001).

In addition, PCI via transradial access in patients with STEMI was associated with a lower rate of bleeding (2.42% vs. 5.62%; adjusted OR=0.53; 95% CI, 0.33-0.84) and a lower rate of blood transfusion (3.42% vs. 5.3%; adjusted OR=0.54; 95% CI, 0.35-0.84) compared with transfemoral access, according to the researchers.

Howe and colleagues found no difference by access type in in-hospital mortality for patients with STEMI who underwent PCI (transradial group, 1.51%; transfemoral group, 2.34%; adjusted OR=0.59; 95% CI, 0.3-1.16.) – by Erik Swain

For more information:

Howe M. Abstract A-019. Presented at: the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Scientific Sessions; May 28-31, 2014; Las Vegas.

Disclosure: Howe reports no relevant financial disclosures.

LAS VEGAS — Patients who underwent PCI after STEMI had lower rates of bleeding and blood transfusion if the procedure was performed via transradial access compared with transfemoral access, according to data presented at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Scientific Sessions.

Researchers also reported that the use of transradial access increased from January 2010 to June 2013, albeit at a lower rate for patients with STEMI than for other patients.

Michael Howe, MD, from the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center, and colleagues analyzed patients who underwent PCI at 44 hospitals from the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium from 2010 to 2013. The cohort included 108,060 PCI procedures, 13.7% of which were performed in patients with STEMI.

Michael Howe, MD

Michael Howe

Among those with STEMI, 6.72% underwent PCI via transradial access during the study period, Howe reported. The rate of adoption of transradial access for patients undergoing PCI after STEMI (January 2010, <1%; June 2013, 14.2%; slope, 1.09% per quarter) was slower than that for patients undergoing PCI for other reasons (January 2010, 2.2%; June 2013, 27.5%; slope, 2.04% per quarter; P<.001).

In addition, PCI via transradial access in patients with STEMI was associated with a lower rate of bleeding (2.42% vs. 5.62%; adjusted OR=0.53; 95% CI, 0.33-0.84) and a lower rate of blood transfusion (3.42% vs. 5.3%; adjusted OR=0.54; 95% CI, 0.35-0.84) compared with transfemoral access, according to the researchers.

Howe and colleagues found no difference by access type in in-hospital mortality for patients with STEMI who underwent PCI (transradial group, 1.51%; transfemoral group, 2.34%; adjusted OR=0.59; 95% CI, 0.3-1.16.) – by Erik Swain

For more information:

Howe M. Abstract A-019. Presented at: the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Scientific Sessions; May 28-31, 2014; Las Vegas.

Disclosure: Howe reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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