In the Journals

Cardiology Today’s top 5 stories posted in June

Cardiology Today compiled a list of the top 5 stories posted in June.

This month, our readers were most interested in atrial fibrillation burden as a measurement of stroke risk, stroke reduction with rivaroxaban, reducing CVD risk in type 2 diabetes by adopting a healthy lifestyle, new data from the COMPASS trial, diagnosing stroke survivors with hypertension using new BP guidelines and more.

VIDEO: New insights on AF burden as a measure of stroke risk

In this Cardiology Today video exclusive, Matthew D. Solomon, MD, PhD, cardiologist at Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center and adjunct investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, discusses findings from the KP-RHYTHM study, which found that an increase in AF burden is independently associated with greater risk for ischemic stroke and arterial thromboembolism in patients who are not taking anticoagulants.

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Rivaroxaban reduces stroke, systemic embolism in frail patients vs. warfarin

Among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and frailty, rivaroxaban was associated with reduced risk for stroke and systemic embolism compared with warfarin, according to the results of a cohort study.

In this population, rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Janssen/Bayer) was associated with similar bleeding risk compared with warfarin, whereas dabigatran (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim) and apixaban (Eliquis, Bristol-Myers Squibb/Pfizer) were associated with similar stroke/systemic embolism risk and similar bleeding risk vs. warfarin.

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Healthy lifestyle lowers CVD risk in type 2 diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes who adhered to a healthy lifestyle had decreased risk for CVD and CVD mortality, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Read More

 

COMPASS: Low-dose rivaroxaban plus aspirin may benefit patients with chronic CAD, PAD, HF

Patients with chronic CAD and peripheral artery disease with or without HF who were treated with low-dose rivaroxaban plus aspirin had reduced rates of major adverse CV events and showed a net clinical benefit compared with those treated with aspirin alone, according to a subanalysis of the COMPASS trial presented at Heart Failure 2018 & World Congress on Acute Heart Failure.

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New BP guideline diagnoses more stroke survivors with hypertension

The 2017 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association hypertension guideline may increase the number of U.S. patients who survived a stroke and were diagnosed with hypertension compared with a previous guideline, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“The new guideline offers physicians and policymakers a unique opportunity to reinforce the already decreasing stroke-related mortality trends of the last few decades,” Alain Lekoubou, MD, MSc, clinical instructor in neurology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, said in a press release. “It is our responsibility to ensure that stroke survivors identified with hypertension are treated more aggressively and to ensure that those on treatment remain on treatment.”

Read More

Cardiology Today compiled a list of the top 5 stories posted in June.

This month, our readers were most interested in atrial fibrillation burden as a measurement of stroke risk, stroke reduction with rivaroxaban, reducing CVD risk in type 2 diabetes by adopting a healthy lifestyle, new data from the COMPASS trial, diagnosing stroke survivors with hypertension using new BP guidelines and more.

VIDEO: New insights on AF burden as a measure of stroke risk

In this Cardiology Today video exclusive, Matthew D. Solomon, MD, PhD, cardiologist at Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center and adjunct investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, discusses findings from the KP-RHYTHM study, which found that an increase in AF burden is independently associated with greater risk for ischemic stroke and arterial thromboembolism in patients who are not taking anticoagulants.

Read More

 

Rivaroxaban reduces stroke, systemic embolism in frail patients vs. warfarin

Among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and frailty, rivaroxaban was associated with reduced risk for stroke and systemic embolism compared with warfarin, according to the results of a cohort study.

In this population, rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Janssen/Bayer) was associated with similar bleeding risk compared with warfarin, whereas dabigatran (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim) and apixaban (Eliquis, Bristol-Myers Squibb/Pfizer) were associated with similar stroke/systemic embolism risk and similar bleeding risk vs. warfarin.

Read More

 

Healthy lifestyle lowers CVD risk in type 2 diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes who adhered to a healthy lifestyle had decreased risk for CVD and CVD mortality, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Read More

 

COMPASS: Low-dose rivaroxaban plus aspirin may benefit patients with chronic CAD, PAD, HF

Patients with chronic CAD and peripheral artery disease with or without HF who were treated with low-dose rivaroxaban plus aspirin had reduced rates of major adverse CV events and showed a net clinical benefit compared with those treated with aspirin alone, according to a subanalysis of the COMPASS trial presented at Heart Failure 2018 & World Congress on Acute Heart Failure.

Read More

 

New BP guideline diagnoses more stroke survivors with hypertension

The 2017 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association hypertension guideline may increase the number of U.S. patients who survived a stroke and were diagnosed with hypertension compared with a previous guideline, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“The new guideline offers physicians and policymakers a unique opportunity to reinforce the already decreasing stroke-related mortality trends of the last few decades,” Alain Lekoubou, MD, MSc, clinical instructor in neurology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, said in a press release. “It is our responsibility to ensure that stroke survivors identified with hypertension are treated more aggressively and to ensure that those on treatment remain on treatment.”

Read More