In the Journals

Obesity increases risk for high BP in children

Children with excess weight or abdominal obesity at age 4 years had an increased risk for high BP after 2 years of follow-up, according to a study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

“The myth that excess weight in children has no consequences hampers the prevention and control of this health problem,” Iñaki Galán, MD, of the National Centre for Epidemiology at the Instituto de Salud Carlos III in Madrid, said in a press release. “Parents need to be more physically active with young children and provide a healthy diet. Women should shed extra pounds before becoming pregnancy, avoid gaining excess weight during pregnancy and quit smoking, as these are all established risk factors for childhood obesity.”

Maira A. Ortiz-Pinto, of the National Centre for Epidemiology at the Instituto de Salud Carlos III in Madrid, and colleagues analyzed data from 1,796 children from Spain who underwent a physical examination at age 4 years. Children also underwent assessment at age 6 years. Measurements taken at the physical examinations included weight, height, waist circumference, BMI and BP.

Those with obesity at age 4 years had an average 4 mm Hg to 5 mm Hg increase in systolic BP and a 2.5 mm Hg to 3 mm Hg increase in diastolic BP at age 6 years, the researchers reported.

Children with excess weight or abdominal obesity at age 4 years had an increased risk for high BP after 2 years of follow-up, according to a study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.
Source: Adobe Stock

Children with incident cases of excess weight had an OR of 2.49 for high BP compared with those who maintained a non-excess weight during follow-up (95% CI, 1.5-4.13). The OR for children with persistent cases of excess weight was 2.54 (95% CI, 1.27-5.07).

Children with abdominal obesity had an OR of 2.81 for incident cases (95% CI, 0.98-8.02) and 3.42 for persistent cases (95% CI, 1.38-8.49), according to the study.

There were similar estimates for waist-height ratio.

An increased risk for high BP was not seen in children with obesity who then had non-excess weight at follow-up.

“The proposal of a screening program for hypertension targeted at at-risk groups such as children with excess weight or with general or abdominal obesity should be evaluated to be integrated into clinical practice,” Ortiz-Pinto and colleagues wrote. – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Children with excess weight or abdominal obesity at age 4 years had an increased risk for high BP after 2 years of follow-up, according to a study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

“The myth that excess weight in children has no consequences hampers the prevention and control of this health problem,” Iñaki Galán, MD, of the National Centre for Epidemiology at the Instituto de Salud Carlos III in Madrid, said in a press release. “Parents need to be more physically active with young children and provide a healthy diet. Women should shed extra pounds before becoming pregnancy, avoid gaining excess weight during pregnancy and quit smoking, as these are all established risk factors for childhood obesity.”

Maira A. Ortiz-Pinto, of the National Centre for Epidemiology at the Instituto de Salud Carlos III in Madrid, and colleagues analyzed data from 1,796 children from Spain who underwent a physical examination at age 4 years. Children also underwent assessment at age 6 years. Measurements taken at the physical examinations included weight, height, waist circumference, BMI and BP.

Those with obesity at age 4 years had an average 4 mm Hg to 5 mm Hg increase in systolic BP and a 2.5 mm Hg to 3 mm Hg increase in diastolic BP at age 6 years, the researchers reported.

Children with excess weight or abdominal obesity at age 4 years had an increased risk for high BP after 2 years of follow-up, according to a study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.
Source: Adobe Stock

Children with incident cases of excess weight had an OR of 2.49 for high BP compared with those who maintained a non-excess weight during follow-up (95% CI, 1.5-4.13). The OR for children with persistent cases of excess weight was 2.54 (95% CI, 1.27-5.07).

Children with abdominal obesity had an OR of 2.81 for incident cases (95% CI, 0.98-8.02) and 3.42 for persistent cases (95% CI, 1.38-8.49), according to the study.

There were similar estimates for waist-height ratio.

An increased risk for high BP was not seen in children with obesity who then had non-excess weight at follow-up.

“The proposal of a screening program for hypertension targeted at at-risk groups such as children with excess weight or with general or abdominal obesity should be evaluated to be integrated into clinical practice,” Ortiz-Pinto and colleagues wrote. – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.