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VIDEO: Expert discusses efficacy of subcutaneous ICD in EFFORTLESS study

SAN FRANCISCO — In this video, Lucas V.A. Boersma, MD, PhD, from St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Netherlands, discusses data from the EFFORTLESS study of a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator, which he presented at the Heart Rhythm Society Annual Scientific Sessions.

At 1-year follow-up, 98% of patients implanted with the device (Emblem S-ICD System, Boston Scientific) were free from device complications, exceeding the FDA’s pre-specified endpoint of 79%, he said.

Other endpoints of interest were an infection rate of 2%, a rate of inappropriate shock from atrial fibrillation or supraventricular tachycardia of 1.5% and an overall 1-year rate of inappropriate shock of 8.1%, he said.

Boersma also said that he and his colleagues observed a 99.5% rate of successful acute conversion testing.

“The S-ICD continues to show that the data are robust, that it saves lives ... with [a] new algorithm we can also avoid T-wave over-sensing, which will ... lower the inappropriate shock rate tremendously in patients,” Boersma said. “I think that the future looks bright for S-ICD.”

SAN FRANCISCO — In this video, Lucas V.A. Boersma, MD, PhD, from St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Netherlands, discusses data from the EFFORTLESS study of a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator, which he presented at the Heart Rhythm Society Annual Scientific Sessions.

At 1-year follow-up, 98% of patients implanted with the device (Emblem S-ICD System, Boston Scientific) were free from device complications, exceeding the FDA’s pre-specified endpoint of 79%, he said.

Other endpoints of interest were an infection rate of 2%, a rate of inappropriate shock from atrial fibrillation or supraventricular tachycardia of 1.5% and an overall 1-year rate of inappropriate shock of 8.1%, he said.

Boersma also said that he and his colleagues observed a 99.5% rate of successful acute conversion testing.

“The S-ICD continues to show that the data are robust, that it saves lives ... with [a] new algorithm we can also avoid T-wave over-sensing, which will ... lower the inappropriate shock rate tremendously in patients,” Boersma said. “I think that the future looks bright for S-ICD.”

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