In the Journals

Methamphetamine use confers worse outcomes in veterans with HF

Marin Nishimura
Marin Nishimura

The use of methamphetamine in veterans with HF increased and may be associated with worse outcomes, according to a study published in The American Journal of Cardiology.

Marin Nishimura, MD, internal medicine resident at University of California, San Diego, and colleagues analyzed data from patients with HF who were hospitalized at the San Diego VA Medical Center between January 2005 and September 2015.

Patients were categorized by whether they abused methamphetamine (n = 106; mean age, 61 years; 99% men) or not (n = 96; mean age, 71 years; 98% men). Methamphetamine abuse was defined as the mention of methamphetamine dependence in the problem list, hospitalization for methamphetamine dependence or a positive urine toxicology screen for methamphetamine.

Follow-up was conducted for 180 days.

A history of methamphetamine abuse increased from 3.44% in 2006 to 6.7% in 2015.

Compared with patients with HF without a history of methamphetamine abuse, those with a history were more likely to have PTSD (16.8% vs. 4.4%; P = .006) and depression (28.7% vs. 11%; P = .002). In addition, patients with a history of methamphetamine abuse were more likely to be homeless (27.9% vs. 8.9%; P = .001) and unemployed (55.8% vs. 30%; P < .001).

The use of methamphetamine in veterans with HF increased and may be associated with worse outcomes, according to a study published in The American Journal of Cardiology.
Source: Adobe Stock

At 6 months, patients with HF and a history of methamphetamine abuse had a higher rate of mortality (27% vs. 38%; P = .1) and HF readmission or ED room visit (49% vs. 38%; P = .34) compared with those without a history of abuse.

“Given the risking prevalence of [methamphetamine use] among veterans with heart failure, greater recognition of the complex underpinnings of this disease process may be needed to improve clinical outcomes among this patient population,” Nishimura and colleagues wrote. – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Marin Nishimura
Marin Nishimura

The use of methamphetamine in veterans with HF increased and may be associated with worse outcomes, according to a study published in The American Journal of Cardiology.

Marin Nishimura, MD, internal medicine resident at University of California, San Diego, and colleagues analyzed data from patients with HF who were hospitalized at the San Diego VA Medical Center between January 2005 and September 2015.

Patients were categorized by whether they abused methamphetamine (n = 106; mean age, 61 years; 99% men) or not (n = 96; mean age, 71 years; 98% men). Methamphetamine abuse was defined as the mention of methamphetamine dependence in the problem list, hospitalization for methamphetamine dependence or a positive urine toxicology screen for methamphetamine.

Follow-up was conducted for 180 days.

A history of methamphetamine abuse increased from 3.44% in 2006 to 6.7% in 2015.

Compared with patients with HF without a history of methamphetamine abuse, those with a history were more likely to have PTSD (16.8% vs. 4.4%; P = .006) and depression (28.7% vs. 11%; P = .002). In addition, patients with a history of methamphetamine abuse were more likely to be homeless (27.9% vs. 8.9%; P = .001) and unemployed (55.8% vs. 30%; P < .001).

The use of methamphetamine in veterans with HF increased and may be associated with worse outcomes, according to a study published in The American Journal of Cardiology.
Source: Adobe Stock

At 6 months, patients with HF and a history of methamphetamine abuse had a higher rate of mortality (27% vs. 38%; P = .1) and HF readmission or ED room visit (49% vs. 38%; P = .34) compared with those without a history of abuse.

“Given the risking prevalence of [methamphetamine use] among veterans with heart failure, greater recognition of the complex underpinnings of this disease process may be needed to improve clinical outcomes among this patient population,” Nishimura and colleagues wrote. – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.