AHA issues grant to develop therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Bijan K . Dey, PhD, a scientist at The RNA Institute at the University at Albany, received a grant from the American Heart Association to support his research on Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the associated cardiomyopathy.

HF is most common cause of death in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic degenerative disease that affects male children.

“DMD afflicts 1 in 3,000 live male births, representing over 2.5 million young boys between the ages of 2 and 7 worldwide,” Dey said in a press release from the University at Albany. “The goal of my research is to gain a better understanding of the pathophysiology of DMD and DMD-associated cardiomyopathy in molecular detail, and to devise a cutting edge platform for effective therapy.”

According to the release, patients with DMD-associated cardiomyopathy have an enlarged left ventricle and weakened cardiac wall muscles, are often restricted to wheelchairs starting in the first decade of life, and commonly die young of HF.

The grant will fund Dey’s research through 2020.

 

Bijan K . Dey, PhD, a scientist at The RNA Institute at the University at Albany, received a grant from the American Heart Association to support his research on Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the associated cardiomyopathy.

HF is most common cause of death in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic degenerative disease that affects male children.

“DMD afflicts 1 in 3,000 live male births, representing over 2.5 million young boys between the ages of 2 and 7 worldwide,” Dey said in a press release from the University at Albany. “The goal of my research is to gain a better understanding of the pathophysiology of DMD and DMD-associated cardiomyopathy in molecular detail, and to devise a cutting edge platform for effective therapy.”

According to the release, patients with DMD-associated cardiomyopathy have an enlarged left ventricle and weakened cardiac wall muscles, are often restricted to wheelchairs starting in the first decade of life, and commonly die young of HF.

The grant will fund Dey’s research through 2020.