In the Journals

HF-related death rising, especially in black men

Sadiya S. Khan
Sadiya S. Khan

The rates of HF-related CVD death have increased since 2012 among U.S. adults, most prominently in younger black men, according to a research letter published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Racial disparities in HF-related CVD death were more pronounced in adults aged 35 to 64 years than in adults aged 65 to 84 years, according to the researchers.

Sadiya S. Khan, MD, MSc, and colleagues sought to evaluate national trends in mortality attributed to HF-related CVD by sex and race.

“The success of the last 3 decades in improving heart failure death rates is now being reversed, and it is likely due to the obesity and diabetes epidemics,” Khan, a cardiologist an assistant professor of medicine at Northwestern University, said in a press release. “We focused on patients with heart failure because they have the highest mortality related to cardiovascular death. They have a prognosis similar to metastatic lung cancer.”

The researchers obtained data using multiple cause-of-death files from the CDC’s Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemic Research (WONDER). The database includes the underlying and contributing cause of death from all death certificates in the United States.

Khan and colleagues discerned HF-related CVD deaths in which CVD was the underlying cause of death and HF was a contributing cause of death among black and white adults aged 35 to 84 years.

The researchers calculated age-adjusted mortality rates using 2000 U.S. Census Bureau data.

Age-adjusted rates for HF-related CVD death declined from 1999 to 2012 (78.7 per 100,000 people vs. 53.7 per 100,000 people; P < .05), Khan and colleagues wrote.

However, there was a significant increase in HF-related CVD death from 2012 to 2017, when the rate reached 59.3 per 100,000 people (P < .05). Among all groups stratified by age and race, the increase was highest in black men aged 35 to 64 years, according to the researchers.

From 1999 to 2017, black men had a higher age-adjusted HF-related CVD death rate compared with white men (1.16-fold vs. 1.43-fold; P < .05), the researchers wrote. Black women had a higher age adjusted HF-related CVD death rate compared with white women (1.35-fold vs. 1.54-fold, P < .05).

The rates of HF-related CVD death have increased since 2012 among U.S. adults, most prominently in younger black men, according to a research letter published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Source: Adobe Stock

The disparities were more pronounced in adults aged 35 to 64 years compared with adults aged 65 to 84 years, Khan and colleagues wrote.

Age-adjusted HF-related CVD death in 2017 was 2.6-fold higher in young black men compared with young white men, whereas it was 2.97-fold higher in young black women compared with young white women, the researchers wrote.

According to Khan and colleagues, population-wide policy measures are urgently needed to eliminate racial disparities and target individuals earlier in life for HF prevention.

“To combat this disturbing trend, we need to focus on improving the control of risk factors including blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes,” Khan said in the release. “Healthy lifestyle changes promoting a normal body mass index also can protect from developing heart failure as well as engaging in regular physical activity and consuming a healthy, well-balanced diet.” – by Earl Holland Jr.

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Sadiya S. Khan
Sadiya S. Khan

The rates of HF-related CVD death have increased since 2012 among U.S. adults, most prominently in younger black men, according to a research letter published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Racial disparities in HF-related CVD death were more pronounced in adults aged 35 to 64 years than in adults aged 65 to 84 years, according to the researchers.

Sadiya S. Khan, MD, MSc, and colleagues sought to evaluate national trends in mortality attributed to HF-related CVD by sex and race.

“The success of the last 3 decades in improving heart failure death rates is now being reversed, and it is likely due to the obesity and diabetes epidemics,” Khan, a cardiologist an assistant professor of medicine at Northwestern University, said in a press release. “We focused on patients with heart failure because they have the highest mortality related to cardiovascular death. They have a prognosis similar to metastatic lung cancer.”

The researchers obtained data using multiple cause-of-death files from the CDC’s Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemic Research (WONDER). The database includes the underlying and contributing cause of death from all death certificates in the United States.

Khan and colleagues discerned HF-related CVD deaths in which CVD was the underlying cause of death and HF was a contributing cause of death among black and white adults aged 35 to 84 years.

The researchers calculated age-adjusted mortality rates using 2000 U.S. Census Bureau data.

Age-adjusted rates for HF-related CVD death declined from 1999 to 2012 (78.7 per 100,000 people vs. 53.7 per 100,000 people; P < .05), Khan and colleagues wrote.

However, there was a significant increase in HF-related CVD death from 2012 to 2017, when the rate reached 59.3 per 100,000 people (P < .05). Among all groups stratified by age and race, the increase was highest in black men aged 35 to 64 years, according to the researchers.

From 1999 to 2017, black men had a higher age-adjusted HF-related CVD death rate compared with white men (1.16-fold vs. 1.43-fold; P < .05), the researchers wrote. Black women had a higher age adjusted HF-related CVD death rate compared with white women (1.35-fold vs. 1.54-fold, P < .05).

The rates of HF-related CVD death have increased since 2012 among U.S. adults, most prominently in younger black men, according to a research letter published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Source: Adobe Stock

The disparities were more pronounced in adults aged 35 to 64 years compared with adults aged 65 to 84 years, Khan and colleagues wrote.

Age-adjusted HF-related CVD death in 2017 was 2.6-fold higher in young black men compared with young white men, whereas it was 2.97-fold higher in young black women compared with young white women, the researchers wrote.

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According to Khan and colleagues, population-wide policy measures are urgently needed to eliminate racial disparities and target individuals earlier in life for HF prevention.

“To combat this disturbing trend, we need to focus on improving the control of risk factors including blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes,” Khan said in the release. “Healthy lifestyle changes promoting a normal body mass index also can protect from developing heart failure as well as engaging in regular physical activity and consuming a healthy, well-balanced diet.” – by Earl Holland Jr.

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.