In the Journals

CV effects of soy consistent over time

Claims made by the FDA on the association between soy protein products and decreased cholesterol more than 2 decades ago are still relevant, according to a report published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

David J.A. Jenkins, MD, PhD, professor of nutritional sciences and medicine at the University of Toronto, and colleagues investigated whether FDA heart-health claims for soy protein, issued in 1999, should be revoked.

“At no time since the original claim for soy as a reducer of serum cholesterol has its ability been in question,” Jenkins said in a press release. “It’s been consistent since 1999. The data have not changed.”

The researchers conducted a meta-analysis of soy trials identified by the FDA on the effect on total cholesterol and LDL.

In the 43 studies eligible for analysis, Jenkins and colleagues identified 2,607 participants (mean age, 55 years; 37% men; 49% with hypercholesterolemia).

The mean reduction of LDL in 1999 was –6.3 mg/dL (95% CI, –8.7 to –3.9), the researchers found. In the years following, there was a minimum reduction of –4.2 mg/dL (95% CI, –6.6 to – 1.8) in 2006 and a maximum reduction of –6.7 mg/dL (95% CI, – 10.2 to –3.2) in 2002.

At no time did the cholesterol or LDL reductions lose significance or were the differences at individual time points in the cumulative meta-analysis significantly different from what was seen when the health claims were approved, Jenkins and colleagues wrote.

Claims made by the FDA on the association between soy protein products and decreased cholesterol more than 2 decades ago are still relevant, according to a report published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
Source: Adobe Stock

“These data strongly support the rationale behind the original FDA heart health claim for soy,” Jenkins said in the release. “And it’s important to note that while the reduction in cholesterol was less than 5%, if you put that together with other plant-based foods in a portfolio you get a much stronger effect.” – by Earl Holland Jr.

Disclosures: Jenkins reports he receives numerous research, speaking and industry grants. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Claims made by the FDA on the association between soy protein products and decreased cholesterol more than 2 decades ago are still relevant, according to a report published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

David J.A. Jenkins, MD, PhD, professor of nutritional sciences and medicine at the University of Toronto, and colleagues investigated whether FDA heart-health claims for soy protein, issued in 1999, should be revoked.

“At no time since the original claim for soy as a reducer of serum cholesterol has its ability been in question,” Jenkins said in a press release. “It’s been consistent since 1999. The data have not changed.”

The researchers conducted a meta-analysis of soy trials identified by the FDA on the effect on total cholesterol and LDL.

In the 43 studies eligible for analysis, Jenkins and colleagues identified 2,607 participants (mean age, 55 years; 37% men; 49% with hypercholesterolemia).

The mean reduction of LDL in 1999 was –6.3 mg/dL (95% CI, –8.7 to –3.9), the researchers found. In the years following, there was a minimum reduction of –4.2 mg/dL (95% CI, –6.6 to – 1.8) in 2006 and a maximum reduction of –6.7 mg/dL (95% CI, – 10.2 to –3.2) in 2002.

At no time did the cholesterol or LDL reductions lose significance or were the differences at individual time points in the cumulative meta-analysis significantly different from what was seen when the health claims were approved, Jenkins and colleagues wrote.

Claims made by the FDA on the association between soy protein products and decreased cholesterol more than 2 decades ago are still relevant, according to a report published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
Source: Adobe Stock

“These data strongly support the rationale behind the original FDA heart health claim for soy,” Jenkins said in the release. “And it’s important to note that while the reduction in cholesterol was less than 5%, if you put that together with other plant-based foods in a portfolio you get a much stronger effect.” – by Earl Holland Jr.

Disclosures: Jenkins reports he receives numerous research, speaking and industry grants. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.