In the Journals

Controlling BP, cholesterol may halve risk for heart disease

Patients may reduce their risk for CVD by at least half by achieving concomitant control of BP and cholesterol, according to research recently published in Circulation. However, a national data review suggests that less than one in three patients had both conditions under control.

Researchers analyzed National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 1988 to 1994, 1999 to 2004 and 2005 to 2010. In all surveys combined, 60.7% to 64.3% of patients with hypertension also had hypercholesterolemia.

Researchers found that control of LDL improved from 1988 to 1994 (OR=9.2; 95% CI, 6.6-11.9) to 2005 to 2010 (OR=45.4; 95% CI, 42.6-48.3). Control of concomitant hypertension and LDL also improved during this time (OR=5.0; 95% CI, 3.3-6.7 vs. OR=30.7; 95% CI, 27.9-33.4), as did combined control of hypertension, LDL and non-HDL (OR=1.8; 95% CI, 0.4-3.2 vs. OR=26.9; 95% CI, 24.4-29.5).

Brent M. Egan, MD 

Brent M. Egan

According to a multivariable logistic regression analysis, factors associated with concomitant control of hypertension, LDL and non-HDL were use of statins (OR=10.7; 95% CI, 8.1-14.3) and antihypertensive medications (OR=3.32; 95% CI, 2.45-4.50); age (OR=0.77; 95% CI, 0.69-0.88 per 10-year increase); accessing health care at least twice per year (OR=1.96; 95% CI, 1.23-3.11); black race (OR=0.59; 95% CI, 0.44-0.80); Hispanic ethnicity (OR=0.62; 95% CI, 0.43-0.90); CVD (OR=0.44; 95% CI, 0.34-0.56); and diabetes (OR=0.54; 95% CI, 0.42-0.70).

“The main message is for people to know that blood pressure and cholesterol control are important to preventing heart disease and stroke,” Brent M. Egan, MD, study researcher and professor of medicine and pharmacology at Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, S.C., told Cardiology Today. “Healthy lifestyles are an important component as well as taking medications if needed to obtain good control of both risk factors. While the article focuses on preventing heart disease, which is very important, maintaining healthy blood vessels is important to overall quality of life.”

Disclosure: Egan reports receiving research support from Daiichi-Sankyo, Medtronic, Novartis and Takeda. He has also served as a consultant to AstraZeneca, Daiichi-Sankyo, Medtronic, Novartis, Takeda and Blue Cross Blue Shield South Carolina.

Patients may reduce their risk for CVD by at least half by achieving concomitant control of BP and cholesterol, according to research recently published in Circulation. However, a national data review suggests that less than one in three patients had both conditions under control.

Researchers analyzed National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 1988 to 1994, 1999 to 2004 and 2005 to 2010. In all surveys combined, 60.7% to 64.3% of patients with hypertension also had hypercholesterolemia.

Researchers found that control of LDL improved from 1988 to 1994 (OR=9.2; 95% CI, 6.6-11.9) to 2005 to 2010 (OR=45.4; 95% CI, 42.6-48.3). Control of concomitant hypertension and LDL also improved during this time (OR=5.0; 95% CI, 3.3-6.7 vs. OR=30.7; 95% CI, 27.9-33.4), as did combined control of hypertension, LDL and non-HDL (OR=1.8; 95% CI, 0.4-3.2 vs. OR=26.9; 95% CI, 24.4-29.5).

Brent M. Egan, MD 

Brent M. Egan

According to a multivariable logistic regression analysis, factors associated with concomitant control of hypertension, LDL and non-HDL were use of statins (OR=10.7; 95% CI, 8.1-14.3) and antihypertensive medications (OR=3.32; 95% CI, 2.45-4.50); age (OR=0.77; 95% CI, 0.69-0.88 per 10-year increase); accessing health care at least twice per year (OR=1.96; 95% CI, 1.23-3.11); black race (OR=0.59; 95% CI, 0.44-0.80); Hispanic ethnicity (OR=0.62; 95% CI, 0.43-0.90); CVD (OR=0.44; 95% CI, 0.34-0.56); and diabetes (OR=0.54; 95% CI, 0.42-0.70).

“The main message is for people to know that blood pressure and cholesterol control are important to preventing heart disease and stroke,” Brent M. Egan, MD, study researcher and professor of medicine and pharmacology at Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, S.C., told Cardiology Today. “Healthy lifestyles are an important component as well as taking medications if needed to obtain good control of both risk factors. While the article focuses on preventing heart disease, which is very important, maintaining healthy blood vessels is important to overall quality of life.”

Disclosure: Egan reports receiving research support from Daiichi-Sankyo, Medtronic, Novartis and Takeda. He has also served as a consultant to AstraZeneca, Daiichi-Sankyo, Medtronic, Novartis, Takeda and Blue Cross Blue Shield South Carolina.