CV societies communicate support for bills to curb youth tobacco use

Eleven cardiology professional societies have written letters to Congress to support two bills that would restrict youth access to tobacco products.

The Tobacco-Free Youth Act, proposed in the Senate by Sens. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Tim Kaine, D-Va., would raise the national minimum age to buy tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes and other vaping devices, from 18 to 21 years, and allow states to enact stricter restrictions if desired. The Tobacco to 21 Act, proposed in the Senate by Sens. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, Todd Young, R-Ind., Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and Mitt Romney, R-Utah, and in the House of Representatives by Reps. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., and Chris Stewart, R-Utah, would prevent the sale of tobacco products to anyone younger than 21 years.

The letters, written by the American College of Cardiology, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the Association of Black Cardiologists, the Heart Failure Society of America, the Heart Rhythm Society, the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, the Society for Vascular Medicine, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, express “strong support” for both bills.

“Thank you for introducing this important legislation to address a crippling public health crisis that is threatening to diminish the many years of progress our country has made in reducing tobacco use,” the societies wrote in both letters, addressed to the respective sponsors.

Eleven cardiology professional societies have written letters to Congress to support two bills that would restrict youth access to tobacco products.
Source: Adobe Stock

The letters state that tobacco use has long been associated with CVD, that a 2016 study found that smoking harms the structure and function of the heart and can lead to HF, and that “e-cigarettes, which have been growing in popularity, especially among minors, are as harmful to the heart as smoking combustible cigarettes.”

“Our organizations applaud your leadership on this important issue and look forward to helping advance legislation to further reduce youth tobacco use across the country,” the societies wrote in both letters. “We stand ready to partner with you and other stakeholders to achieve that goal.” – by Erik Swain

Eleven cardiology professional societies have written letters to Congress to support two bills that would restrict youth access to tobacco products.

The Tobacco-Free Youth Act, proposed in the Senate by Sens. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Tim Kaine, D-Va., would raise the national minimum age to buy tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes and other vaping devices, from 18 to 21 years, and allow states to enact stricter restrictions if desired. The Tobacco to 21 Act, proposed in the Senate by Sens. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, Todd Young, R-Ind., Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and Mitt Romney, R-Utah, and in the House of Representatives by Reps. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., and Chris Stewart, R-Utah, would prevent the sale of tobacco products to anyone younger than 21 years.

The letters, written by the American College of Cardiology, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the Association of Black Cardiologists, the Heart Failure Society of America, the Heart Rhythm Society, the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, the Society for Vascular Medicine, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, express “strong support” for both bills.

“Thank you for introducing this important legislation to address a crippling public health crisis that is threatening to diminish the many years of progress our country has made in reducing tobacco use,” the societies wrote in both letters, addressed to the respective sponsors.

Eleven cardiology professional societies have written letters to Congress to support two bills that would restrict youth access to tobacco products.
Source: Adobe Stock

The letters state that tobacco use has long been associated with CVD, that a 2016 study found that smoking harms the structure and function of the heart and can lead to HF, and that “e-cigarettes, which have been growing in popularity, especially among minors, are as harmful to the heart as smoking combustible cigarettes.”

“Our organizations applaud your leadership on this important issue and look forward to helping advance legislation to further reduce youth tobacco use across the country,” the societies wrote in both letters. “We stand ready to partner with you and other stakeholders to achieve that goal.” – by Erik Swain