Meeting News

Top stories from CMHC: Statin intolerance, Lp(a) impact on CV risk and more

Healio and Cardiology Today present meeting highlights from the Cardiometabolic Health Congress. From the meeting, Healio readers were interested in statin intolerance, wearable devices, metabolic syndrome, health technology and more.

 

Statin intolerance can be fought with intermittent dosing

Intermittent statin dosing is a treatment option that may have tremendous potential for addressing patients with statin intolerance who are trying to reduce LDL, according to a speaker at the Cardiometabolic Health Congress. Read more

 

Lp (a) has strong effect on CVD risk

Lipoprotein(a) has been shown to be an independent, causal and genetic risk factor for CVD, with higher prevalence in patients of African, South Asian, Asian and Oceanic ancestry, according to a presentation at the Cardiometabolic Health Congress. Read more

 

Role of wearable devices increasing in health care

The integration of wearable devices into clinical care is still in its beginning stages, but the devices’ use for ECG and the diagnosis of various arrhythmia disorders remains a top priority for research, according to a presentation at Cardiometabolic Health Congress. Read more

 

Despite new guidelines, CVD prevention barriers remain for some patients

Updated guidelines provide clear CVD prevention strategies for most patients, but barriers to optimal treatment in some patients remain, including issues related to sex, age, inflammation and adequate testing, according to a speaker. Read more

 

Metabolic syndrome may play role in HFpEF risk

Patients with metabolic syndrome are at risk for developing HF with preserved ejection fraction, although the mechanisms behind this risk are speculative at the moment, according to a presentation at the Cardiometabolic Health Congress. Read more

 

Health technology offers new opportunities for physician-patient engagement

New health technologies that focus on self-management of patients may be a unique way for cardiologists to engage with their patients, according to a presentation at the Cardiometabolic Health Congress. Read more

Healio and Cardiology Today present meeting highlights from the Cardiometabolic Health Congress. From the meeting, Healio readers were interested in statin intolerance, wearable devices, metabolic syndrome, health technology and more.

 

Statin intolerance can be fought with intermittent dosing

Intermittent statin dosing is a treatment option that may have tremendous potential for addressing patients with statin intolerance who are trying to reduce LDL, according to a speaker at the Cardiometabolic Health Congress. Read more

 

Lp (a) has strong effect on CVD risk

Lipoprotein(a) has been shown to be an independent, causal and genetic risk factor for CVD, with higher prevalence in patients of African, South Asian, Asian and Oceanic ancestry, according to a presentation at the Cardiometabolic Health Congress. Read more

 

Role of wearable devices increasing in health care

The integration of wearable devices into clinical care is still in its beginning stages, but the devices’ use for ECG and the diagnosis of various arrhythmia disorders remains a top priority for research, according to a presentation at Cardiometabolic Health Congress. Read more

 

Despite new guidelines, CVD prevention barriers remain for some patients

Updated guidelines provide clear CVD prevention strategies for most patients, but barriers to optimal treatment in some patients remain, including issues related to sex, age, inflammation and adequate testing, according to a speaker. Read more

 

Metabolic syndrome may play role in HFpEF risk

Patients with metabolic syndrome are at risk for developing HF with preserved ejection fraction, although the mechanisms behind this risk are speculative at the moment, according to a presentation at the Cardiometabolic Health Congress. Read more

 

Health technology offers new opportunities for physician-patient engagement

New health technologies that focus on self-management of patients may be a unique way for cardiologists to engage with their patients, according to a presentation at the Cardiometabolic Health Congress. Read more

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