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Educational text messages improve glycemic control in CHD, diabetes

PARIS — Patients with CHD and diabetes who received frequent educational and motivational text messages for glycemic control in addition to standard care had a greater reduction in glycated hemoglobin than those who received standard care, according to the results of the CHAT-DM study.

The study showed that the inclusion of tailored, automated text messages six times per week featuring information on glucose monitoring, BP control, medication adherence, physical activity and lifestyle resulted in a greater reduction in HbA1C compared with individuals in the control group (-–0.2% vs. 0.1%, mean change, -0.3%; P = .003), Xiqian Huo, MD, from Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Beijing, reported in a poster presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress.

Standard care for the control group included two monthly messages that featured a “thank you” text rather than educational information, in addition to usual care practices.

Moreover, the intervention group had a greater proportion of patients who achieved HbA1C of less than 7% (69.3% vs. 52.6% in the control group).

“In this randomized trial, a simple, low-cost, automated text messaging program grounded in behavioral change theory improved glycemic control over usual care,” the authors wrote in a simultaneous publication in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. “The findings highlight the feasibility and efficacy of tailored text messaging for secondary prevention of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, which offers the potential to generate public health benefits in diverse populations.”

In other findings, the intervention group also experienced larger changes in fasting blood glucose compared with the control group (mean difference in change between groups, 0.6 mmol/L; 95% CI, 1.1 to0.2; P = .011). No other differences in outcomes were observed between the groups.

The study enrolled 502 Chinese patients with both CHD and diabetes (mean age, 60 years; 17% women; 32.3% with postgraduate/college degrees) and individuals were randomly assigned to the intervention group or the control group.

“A multidisciplinary team of cardiologists, endocrinologists, psychologists, nurses, linguists and patients developed the text message bank through a systematic and iterative approach,” the authors wrote in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. “Messages were drafted based on existing evidence-based guidelines and standards of care, and they incorporated behavioral change techniques to provide advice, motivation and support.” – by Scott Buzby

References:

Huo X, et al. Abstract P573. Presented at: European Society of Cardiology Congress; Aug. 31 to Sept. 4, 2019; Paris.

Huo X, et al. Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2019;doi:10.1161/ CIRCOUTCOMES.119.005805.

Disclosure: Huo reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for the other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

PARIS — Patients with CHD and diabetes who received frequent educational and motivational text messages for glycemic control in addition to standard care had a greater reduction in glycated hemoglobin than those who received standard care, according to the results of the CHAT-DM study.

The study showed that the inclusion of tailored, automated text messages six times per week featuring information on glucose monitoring, BP control, medication adherence, physical activity and lifestyle resulted in a greater reduction in HbA1C compared with individuals in the control group (-–0.2% vs. 0.1%, mean change, -0.3%; P = .003), Xiqian Huo, MD, from Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Beijing, reported in a poster presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress.

Standard care for the control group included two monthly messages that featured a “thank you” text rather than educational information, in addition to usual care practices.

Moreover, the intervention group had a greater proportion of patients who achieved HbA1C of less than 7% (69.3% vs. 52.6% in the control group).

“In this randomized trial, a simple, low-cost, automated text messaging program grounded in behavioral change theory improved glycemic control over usual care,” the authors wrote in a simultaneous publication in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. “The findings highlight the feasibility and efficacy of tailored text messaging for secondary prevention of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, which offers the potential to generate public health benefits in diverse populations.”

In other findings, the intervention group also experienced larger changes in fasting blood glucose compared with the control group (mean difference in change between groups, 0.6 mmol/L; 95% CI, 1.1 to0.2; P = .011). No other differences in outcomes were observed between the groups.

The study enrolled 502 Chinese patients with both CHD and diabetes (mean age, 60 years; 17% women; 32.3% with postgraduate/college degrees) and individuals were randomly assigned to the intervention group or the control group.

“A multidisciplinary team of cardiologists, endocrinologists, psychologists, nurses, linguists and patients developed the text message bank through a systematic and iterative approach,” the authors wrote in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. “Messages were drafted based on existing evidence-based guidelines and standards of care, and they incorporated behavioral change techniques to provide advice, motivation and support.” – by Scott Buzby

References:

Huo X, et al. Abstract P573. Presented at: European Society of Cardiology Congress; Aug. 31 to Sept. 4, 2019; Paris.

Huo X, et al. Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2019;doi:10.1161/ CIRCOUTCOMES.119.005805.

Disclosure: Huo reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for the other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

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