Meeting News

Energy drinks worsen blood vessel function

John P. Higgins

CHICAGO — Young, healthy adults experienced impaired endothelial function less than 2 hours after consuming one energy drink, according to data presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

At baseline, endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation as measured by high-resolution ultrasound was 5.1% in 44 healthy medical students (mean age, 25 years; mean BMI, 23.4 kg/m2). At 90 minutes after consuming a 24-oz energy drink (Monster Energy), flow-mediated dilatation decreased to 2.8% (P = .004).

Before the beginning of the study, participants underwent a BP and pulse check as well as an ECG. The ratio of the post-cuff release and the baseline diameter was used to calculate flow-mediated dilatation.

The study was motivated by the researchers’ concern about the adverse effects being reported with energy drinks, particularly adverse CV effects, and a desire to understand the possible connections, study researcher John P. Higgins, MD, MBA, professor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center McGovern Medical School in Houston, wrote in an email to Cardiology Today.

“Short-term energy drink consumption is associated with attenuated endothelial function,” Higgins said. “[This] might be problematic at times when you need that boost in endothelial function, such as during exercise.”

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Young, healthy adults experienced impaired endothelial function less than 2 hours after consuming one energy drink, according to data presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.
Source: Adobe Stock

In a press release, Higgins said the combination of ingredients in the energy drink, including caffeine, taurine, sugar and other herbals, may be responsible for these negative effects on endothelial function.

“As energy drinks are becoming more and more popular, it is important to study the effects of these drinks on those who frequently drink them and better determine what, if any, is a safe consumption,” the researchers wrote in their abstract.

Higgins said, in the future, he would like to see further study of the effects of energy drinks on endothelial function before and after exercise. – by Melissa Foster

Reference:

Higgins JP, et al. Poster MO-1189. Presented at: American Heart Association Scientific Sessions; Nov. 10-12, 2018; Chicago.

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

John P. Higgins

CHICAGO — Young, healthy adults experienced impaired endothelial function less than 2 hours after consuming one energy drink, according to data presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

At baseline, endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation as measured by high-resolution ultrasound was 5.1% in 44 healthy medical students (mean age, 25 years; mean BMI, 23.4 kg/m2). At 90 minutes after consuming a 24-oz energy drink (Monster Energy), flow-mediated dilatation decreased to 2.8% (P = .004).

Before the beginning of the study, participants underwent a BP and pulse check as well as an ECG. The ratio of the post-cuff release and the baseline diameter was used to calculate flow-mediated dilatation.

The study was motivated by the researchers’ concern about the adverse effects being reported with energy drinks, particularly adverse CV effects, and a desire to understand the possible connections, study researcher John P. Higgins, MD, MBA, professor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center McGovern Medical School in Houston, wrote in an email to Cardiology Today.

“Short-term energy drink consumption is associated with attenuated endothelial function,” Higgins said. “[This] might be problematic at times when you need that boost in endothelial function, such as during exercise.”

#
Young, healthy adults experienced impaired endothelial function less than 2 hours after consuming one energy drink, according to data presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.
Source: Adobe Stock

In a press release, Higgins said the combination of ingredients in the energy drink, including caffeine, taurine, sugar and other herbals, may be responsible for these negative effects on endothelial function.

“As energy drinks are becoming more and more popular, it is important to study the effects of these drinks on those who frequently drink them and better determine what, if any, is a safe consumption,” the researchers wrote in their abstract.

Higgins said, in the future, he would like to see further study of the effects of energy drinks on endothelial function before and after exercise. – by Melissa Foster

Reference:

Higgins JP, et al. Poster MO-1189. Presented at: American Heart Association Scientific Sessions; Nov. 10-12, 2018; Chicago.

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

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