DASH, Mediterranean diets top U.S. News & World Report ranking

The DASH diet and the Mediterranean diet tied for U.S. News & World Report’s annual ranking of Best Diets Overall, Best Heart-Healthy Diets and Best Diets for Healthy Eating.

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, commonly known as DASH, aims to prevent and lower high BP by focusing on consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy and lean proteins. The DASH diet was developed by the NHLBI.

“The consistent high rankings of DASH over the years bode well for the way the diet is received and adopted, not just by health professionals, but by the public at large,” Janet de Jesus, MS, registered dietitian and program officer at NHLBI’s Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science, stated in an NHLBI press release. “This is especially gratifying now that new research underscores the significant blood-pressure lowering effects of a reduced intake of sodium in combination with the DASH diet.”

The Mediterranean diet aims to have a positive impact on weight loss, heart and brain health, cancer prevention, and diabetes prevention and control. The Mediterranean diet focuses on consumption of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, nuts, legumes, olive oil, fish and seafood, with moderate consumption of poultry, eggs, cheese and yogurt, and rare consumption of sweets and red meat.

The U.S. News & World Report ranking evaluated 40 diets, with input from a panel of health experts.

Healio /Cardiology highlights five recent updates on the DASH and Mediterranean diets. Read more by clicking the links below.

 

Experts discuss encouraging patients to consider DASH, which has low adherence despite ‘Best Diet’ ratings

Healio spoke with several experts, including a past president of the American Heart Association and a faculty member where the first leader trial on the DASH diet was performed more than 2 decades ago, on the pros and cons of the DASH diet and how to improve adherence.

Read more

 

VIDEO: Dietary choices empower patients to control BP levels

In this Cardiology Today video perspective, John P. Higgins, MD, MPhil, MBA, FACC, FACP, FAHA, discusses the benefits of the low-sodium DASH diet in light of new preliminary data presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

Read more

 

Mediterranean diet improves cognitive function in older adults

Adhering to a Mediterranean-style diet was associated with better cognition and brain function and a lower risk for cognitive impairment in older adults, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Read more

 

Mediterranean diet with virgin olive oil improves HDL function

A traditional Mediterranean diet enriched with virgin olive oil enhances the function of HDL compared with other diets, according to recent data.

Read more

 

Sodium, coconut oil, sugar intake affects CVD risk

Coconut oil, sodium and added sugars contribute to an increased risk for CVD, according to presentations at AHA Scientific Sessions.

Read more

 

The DASH diet and the Mediterranean diet tied for U.S. News & World Report’s annual ranking of Best Diets Overall, Best Heart-Healthy Diets and Best Diets for Healthy Eating.

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, commonly known as DASH, aims to prevent and lower high BP by focusing on consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy and lean proteins. The DASH diet was developed by the NHLBI.

“The consistent high rankings of DASH over the years bode well for the way the diet is received and adopted, not just by health professionals, but by the public at large,” Janet de Jesus, MS, registered dietitian and program officer at NHLBI’s Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science, stated in an NHLBI press release. “This is especially gratifying now that new research underscores the significant blood-pressure lowering effects of a reduced intake of sodium in combination with the DASH diet.”

The Mediterranean diet aims to have a positive impact on weight loss, heart and brain health, cancer prevention, and diabetes prevention and control. The Mediterranean diet focuses on consumption of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, nuts, legumes, olive oil, fish and seafood, with moderate consumption of poultry, eggs, cheese and yogurt, and rare consumption of sweets and red meat.

The U.S. News & World Report ranking evaluated 40 diets, with input from a panel of health experts.

Healio /Cardiology highlights five recent updates on the DASH and Mediterranean diets. Read more by clicking the links below.

 

Experts discuss encouraging patients to consider DASH, which has low adherence despite ‘Best Diet’ ratings

Healio spoke with several experts, including a past president of the American Heart Association and a faculty member where the first leader trial on the DASH diet was performed more than 2 decades ago, on the pros and cons of the DASH diet and how to improve adherence.

Read more

 

VIDEO: Dietary choices empower patients to control BP levels

In this Cardiology Today video perspective, John P. Higgins, MD, MPhil, MBA, FACC, FACP, FAHA, discusses the benefits of the low-sodium DASH diet in light of new preliminary data presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

Read more

 

Mediterranean diet improves cognitive function in older adults

Adhering to a Mediterranean-style diet was associated with better cognition and brain function and a lower risk for cognitive impairment in older adults, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Read more

 

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Mediterranean diet with virgin olive oil improves HDL function

A traditional Mediterranean diet enriched with virgin olive oil enhances the function of HDL compared with other diets, according to recent data.

Read more

 

Sodium, coconut oil, sugar intake affects CVD risk

Coconut oil, sodium and added sugars contribute to an increased risk for CVD, according to presentations at AHA Scientific Sessions.

Read more