In the Journals

Exercise capacity decreases with higher BMI in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Higher BMI was associated with decreased exercise capacity in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, according to a study published in The American Journal of Cardiology.

Carolyn M. Larsen, MD, a cardiologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, analyzed data from 510 patients (mean age, 51 years; 64% men) who were seen at a tertiary referral center for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from 2006 to 2012. Comprehensive transthoracic echocardiograms and treadmill cardiopulmonary exercise tests were performed within 1 week.

Patients were categorized by BMI: less than 25 kg/m2 (n = 90), 25 kg/m2 to 29.9 kg/m2 (n = 192), 30 kg/m2 to 34.9 kg/m2 (n = 151) and greater than 35 kg/m2 (n = 77).

After adjusting for age and sex, treadmill time and mean peak oxygen consumption decreased as BMI increased (P < .01 for both).

The prevalence of cardiac impairment (P = .59) and the achieved percentage of predicted peak oxygen consumption (P = .75) did not differ in all four BMI groups.

Patients with higher BMIs were more likely to have heart rate abnormalities related to exercise (P < .01 for all).

All variables in a multivariable model, including sex, age, BMI, left ventricular outflow tract gradient at rest, peak heart rate and left atrial volume index, were associated with peak oxygen consumption (P < .05).

“These findings suggest that in a subset of patients with [hypertrophic cardiomyopathy], weight loss may be effective in improving exercise capacity,” Larsen and colleagues wrote. “Prospective study is indicated for evaluation of this hypothesis.” – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: Larsen reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Higher BMI was associated with decreased exercise capacity in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, according to a study published in The American Journal of Cardiology.

Carolyn M. Larsen, MD, a cardiologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, analyzed data from 510 patients (mean age, 51 years; 64% men) who were seen at a tertiary referral center for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from 2006 to 2012. Comprehensive transthoracic echocardiograms and treadmill cardiopulmonary exercise tests were performed within 1 week.

Patients were categorized by BMI: less than 25 kg/m2 (n = 90), 25 kg/m2 to 29.9 kg/m2 (n = 192), 30 kg/m2 to 34.9 kg/m2 (n = 151) and greater than 35 kg/m2 (n = 77).

After adjusting for age and sex, treadmill time and mean peak oxygen consumption decreased as BMI increased (P < .01 for both).

The prevalence of cardiac impairment (P = .59) and the achieved percentage of predicted peak oxygen consumption (P = .75) did not differ in all four BMI groups.

Patients with higher BMIs were more likely to have heart rate abnormalities related to exercise (P < .01 for all).

All variables in a multivariable model, including sex, age, BMI, left ventricular outflow tract gradient at rest, peak heart rate and left atrial volume index, were associated with peak oxygen consumption (P < .05).

“These findings suggest that in a subset of patients with [hypertrophic cardiomyopathy], weight loss may be effective in improving exercise capacity,” Larsen and colleagues wrote. “Prospective study is indicated for evaluation of this hypothesis.” – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: Larsen reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.