Meeting News

Prevention takes center stage at upcoming AHA Scientific Sessions

Eric Peterson

The American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, being held Nov. 10 to 12 in Chicago, will include the release of two major guidelines, the presentation of important science focusing on CVD prevention, a focus on the use of technology to improve CV care and a high-level overview of issues affecting patients and providers.

“There are two major themes [of this year’s meeting],” Eric Peterson, MD, chairman of the AHA’s Committee on Scientific Sessions Programming, Fred Cobb Distinguished Professor of Medicine in the division of cardiology, a Duke Medical School Scholar and executive director of the Duke Clinical Research Institute, said during a media briefing in the advance of the meeting. “First, there is the idea that what we have been doing [for CVD] won’t work and we need to do some things differently in this country, especially with an emphasis on prevention. ... The second theme, from my perspective, is we need to think about new ways of doing this.”

The 2018 American College of Cardiology/AHA cholesterol clinical practice guidelines will be discussed in two different sessions. Presenters will outline the recommendations, including those for primary and secondary prevention, during the first session and discuss other issues, such as risk assessment and cost-effectiveness of drug treatment. The second session will focus on selected cases to understand how the new recommendations should affect clinical practice.

Donald Lloyd-Jones
Donald M. Lloyd-Jones

Also on tap are new HHS physical activity guidelines for Americans — the first update since 2008. The recommendations will shed light on some new research, including recent data on the intensity of exercise duration and how it potentially affects health outcomes, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, MD, ScM, co-chair of the AHA’s Committee on Scientific Sessions Programming; senior associate dean for clinical and translational research and chair of the department of preventive medicine; and director of Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, said during the briefing.

Several late-breaking clinical trials are dedicated to prevention and health technology, including:

  • VITAL, an NIH-sponsored trial with a 2x2 factorial design evaluating the role for vitamin D as well as fish oil or omega-3 fatty acid supplementation for CVD prevention;
  • REDUCE-IT, a primary prevention trial involving more than 8,000 patients assessing high-dose icosapent ethyl (Vascepa, Amarin) for CVD prevention;
  • EWTOPIA75, a trial studying the role of ezetimibe for CVD prevention in elderly patients;
  • DECLARE-TIMI 58, which evaluated whether dapagliflozin (Farxiga, AstraZeneca) is associated with a reduction in CV events in patients with type 2 diabetes;
  • CIRT, an NIH trial looking at whether low-dose methotrexate can modify C-reactive protein levels and also modify the course of CVD in more than 4,000 patients;
  • YOGA, a study assessing the role of yoga in patients who have had an acute event and how it can help post-MI care;
  • PIONEER-HF, which evaluated sacubitril/valsartan (Entresto, Novartis) in patients with acute HF;
  • TRED, a trial looking at withdrawal of HF medications in patients who have had dilated cardiomyopathy;
  • TICAB, a randomized, double blind study of aspirin vs. ticagrelor (Brilinta, AstraZeneca) in patients undergoing CABG; and
  • REGROUP, a study assessing endoscopic vein harvest for CABG.

Additionally, a number of sessions will highlight other issues affecting CV care. For instance, Peterson said, one session will focus on the concept of social determinants and the effect on CVD and total mortality and another will discuss the effects of long-term violence on CV health.

The AHA and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute are sponsoring a joint session during which speakers will discuss the recent plateau in declining CVD mortality in the United States in hopes of identifying strategies to getting physicians and patients back on track.

Cardiology Today and Healio.com will report live from the AHA Scientific Sessions. Stay tuned to Healio.com/Cardiology for breaking news, expert perspectives and more, and follow us on Twitter at @CardiologyToday.

Eric Peterson

The American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, being held Nov. 10 to 12 in Chicago, will include the release of two major guidelines, the presentation of important science focusing on CVD prevention, a focus on the use of technology to improve CV care and a high-level overview of issues affecting patients and providers.

“There are two major themes [of this year’s meeting],” Eric Peterson, MD, chairman of the AHA’s Committee on Scientific Sessions Programming, Fred Cobb Distinguished Professor of Medicine in the division of cardiology, a Duke Medical School Scholar and executive director of the Duke Clinical Research Institute, said during a media briefing in the advance of the meeting. “First, there is the idea that what we have been doing [for CVD] won’t work and we need to do some things differently in this country, especially with an emphasis on prevention. ... The second theme, from my perspective, is we need to think about new ways of doing this.”

The 2018 American College of Cardiology/AHA cholesterol clinical practice guidelines will be discussed in two different sessions. Presenters will outline the recommendations, including those for primary and secondary prevention, during the first session and discuss other issues, such as risk assessment and cost-effectiveness of drug treatment. The second session will focus on selected cases to understand how the new recommendations should affect clinical practice.

Donald Lloyd-Jones
Donald M. Lloyd-Jones

Also on tap are new HHS physical activity guidelines for Americans — the first update since 2008. The recommendations will shed light on some new research, including recent data on the intensity of exercise duration and how it potentially affects health outcomes, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, MD, ScM, co-chair of the AHA’s Committee on Scientific Sessions Programming; senior associate dean for clinical and translational research and chair of the department of preventive medicine; and director of Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, said during the briefing.

Several late-breaking clinical trials are dedicated to prevention and health technology, including:

  • VITAL, an NIH-sponsored trial with a 2x2 factorial design evaluating the role for vitamin D as well as fish oil or omega-3 fatty acid supplementation for CVD prevention;
  • REDUCE-IT, a primary prevention trial involving more than 8,000 patients assessing high-dose icosapent ethyl (Vascepa, Amarin) for CVD prevention;
  • EWTOPIA75, a trial studying the role of ezetimibe for CVD prevention in elderly patients;
  • DECLARE-TIMI 58, which evaluated whether dapagliflozin (Farxiga, AstraZeneca) is associated with a reduction in CV events in patients with type 2 diabetes;
  • CIRT, an NIH trial looking at whether low-dose methotrexate can modify C-reactive protein levels and also modify the course of CVD in more than 4,000 patients;
  • YOGA, a study assessing the role of yoga in patients who have had an acute event and how it can help post-MI care;
  • PIONEER-HF, which evaluated sacubitril/valsartan (Entresto, Novartis) in patients with acute HF;
  • TRED, a trial looking at withdrawal of HF medications in patients who have had dilated cardiomyopathy;
  • TICAB, a randomized, double blind study of aspirin vs. ticagrelor (Brilinta, AstraZeneca) in patients undergoing CABG; and
  • REGROUP, a study assessing endoscopic vein harvest for CABG.

Additionally, a number of sessions will highlight other issues affecting CV care. For instance, Peterson said, one session will focus on the concept of social determinants and the effect on CVD and total mortality and another will discuss the effects of long-term violence on CV health.

The AHA and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute are sponsoring a joint session during which speakers will discuss the recent plateau in declining CVD mortality in the United States in hopes of identifying strategies to getting physicians and patients back on track.

Cardiology Today and Healio.com will report live from the AHA Scientific Sessions. Stay tuned to Healio.com/Cardiology for breaking news, expert perspectives and more, and follow us on Twitter at @CardiologyToday.

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