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VIDEO: Cardiologist highlights CV risks, heart-healthy tips for Super Bowl fans

As previously reported by Cardiology Today, watching professional sports can potentially trigger CV events due to increased heart rate.

With the Super Bowl between the Philadelphia Eagles and New England Patriots vastly approaching, there are ways in which fans can monitor their CV health during the game to avoid CV events such as stroke, MI or hypertensive emergency.

In this video, John Higgins, MD, from the McGovern Medical School at UT Health, discusses the possible risks and how to prepare for them.

“What’s happening with these people is, first of all, they’re getting really excited during the actual football game, so their heart rate goes up and their BP goes up,” Higgins said. “Then on top of that increased work on the heart, they’re also often consuming high-salt snacks, which is going to raise the blood volume, and on top of that, a lot of them are kind of overdoing it on the drinks.”

According to Higgins, another factor is that psychological stress that fans experience while watching the game could potentially trigger cerebrovascular events.

Higgins suggests that patients with known CV risk factors can prepare for the Super Bowl and reduce the risk for CV complications by remembering to pack medications, drinking plenty of water, enjoying healthy snacks and taking physical breaks during commercials and halftime.

“The sun rises in the morning whether your team wins or loses. Focus on the positive aspects of the game, not who lost the game for your team, and in the end, remember to have a fun time,” Higgins said. “Get together with people, socialize, chat and don’t take it too much to heart and have some healthier choices and your heart will be thankful the next day as well.”

As previously reported by Cardiology Today, watching professional sports can potentially trigger CV events due to increased heart rate.

With the Super Bowl between the Philadelphia Eagles and New England Patriots vastly approaching, there are ways in which fans can monitor their CV health during the game to avoid CV events such as stroke, MI or hypertensive emergency.

In this video, John Higgins, MD, from the McGovern Medical School at UT Health, discusses the possible risks and how to prepare for them.

“What’s happening with these people is, first of all, they’re getting really excited during the actual football game, so their heart rate goes up and their BP goes up,” Higgins said. “Then on top of that increased work on the heart, they’re also often consuming high-salt snacks, which is going to raise the blood volume, and on top of that, a lot of them are kind of overdoing it on the drinks.”

According to Higgins, another factor is that psychological stress that fans experience while watching the game could potentially trigger cerebrovascular events.

Higgins suggests that patients with known CV risk factors can prepare for the Super Bowl and reduce the risk for CV complications by remembering to pack medications, drinking plenty of water, enjoying healthy snacks and taking physical breaks during commercials and halftime.

“The sun rises in the morning whether your team wins or loses. Focus on the positive aspects of the game, not who lost the game for your team, and in the end, remember to have a fun time,” Higgins said. “Get together with people, socialize, chat and don’t take it too much to heart and have some healthier choices and your heart will be thankful the next day as well.”