In the Journals

Physical activity improves CV biomarker levels in older patients

Patients aged 60 to 64 years who increased their physical activity and reduced their sedentary time had favorable CV biomarker profile, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“The 60 to 64 age range represents an important transition between work and retirement, when lifestyle behaviors tend to change,” Ahmed Elhakeem, PhD, senior research associate in epidemiology at Bristol Medical School at University of Bristol in the United Kingdom, said in a press release. “It may, therefore, be an opportunity to promote increased physical activity. In addition, cardiovascular disease risk is higher in older adults. It’s important to understand how activity might influence risk in this age group.”

Researchers analyzed data from 1,622 patients (51% women) aged 60 to 64 years from a socially stratified British cohort. Patients were assessed either at a clinical research facility or at home by a research nurse. Blood samples were taken at assessment to analyze endothelial markers, adipokines and inflammatory marker interleukin-6.

Patients also wore a combined movement and heart rate monitor for 5 consecutive days after the clinical assessment. This information was used to determine total physical activity energy expenditure.

Covariates in the study included smoking history, socioeconomic position, BP, long-term illness, diabetes, health problem or disability, CVD and medication use.

Lower C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels were seen in those who spent greater time in light- or moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity. Even after accounting for covariates, these links were stronger in women compared with men.

Increased light- or moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity was also associated with lower tissue plasminogen activator in both men and women, whereas only women had lower leptin and higher adiponectin.

Each standard deviation increase in sedentary time was associated with a 7.9% difference in leptin for men (95% CI, 2.7-13) and a 20.6% difference in women (95% CI, 15.3-25.8).

Fat mass mediated more of the differences in women compared with men.

“As sedentary time and [light-intensity physical activity] were both related to inflammatory and endothelial markers and adipokines independently of [moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity], our findings suggest that it is important for sedentary and inactive older adults to be supported to replace time spent sedentary with any intensity of [physical activity],” Elhakeem and colleagues wrote. – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Patients aged 60 to 64 years who increased their physical activity and reduced their sedentary time had favorable CV biomarker profile, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“The 60 to 64 age range represents an important transition between work and retirement, when lifestyle behaviors tend to change,” Ahmed Elhakeem, PhD, senior research associate in epidemiology at Bristol Medical School at University of Bristol in the United Kingdom, said in a press release. “It may, therefore, be an opportunity to promote increased physical activity. In addition, cardiovascular disease risk is higher in older adults. It’s important to understand how activity might influence risk in this age group.”

Researchers analyzed data from 1,622 patients (51% women) aged 60 to 64 years from a socially stratified British cohort. Patients were assessed either at a clinical research facility or at home by a research nurse. Blood samples were taken at assessment to analyze endothelial markers, adipokines and inflammatory marker interleukin-6.

Patients also wore a combined movement and heart rate monitor for 5 consecutive days after the clinical assessment. This information was used to determine total physical activity energy expenditure.

Covariates in the study included smoking history, socioeconomic position, BP, long-term illness, diabetes, health problem or disability, CVD and medication use.

Lower C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels were seen in those who spent greater time in light- or moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity. Even after accounting for covariates, these links were stronger in women compared with men.

Increased light- or moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity was also associated with lower tissue plasminogen activator in both men and women, whereas only women had lower leptin and higher adiponectin.

Each standard deviation increase in sedentary time was associated with a 7.9% difference in leptin for men (95% CI, 2.7-13) and a 20.6% difference in women (95% CI, 15.3-25.8).

Fat mass mediated more of the differences in women compared with men.

“As sedentary time and [light-intensity physical activity] were both related to inflammatory and endothelial markers and adipokines independently of [moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity], our findings suggest that it is important for sedentary and inactive older adults to be supported to replace time spent sedentary with any intensity of [physical activity],” Elhakeem and colleagues wrote. – by Darlene Dobkowski

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.