Commentary

Advances Continue in Structural, Aortic, Venous Interventions

This is an action-packed March/April issue of Cardiology Today’s Intervention. In this issue, our experts cover a variety of exciting developments in interventional medicine.

An area that has been generating a lot of interest among interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons is percutaneous approaches to valvular heart disease. Of course, transcatheter aortic valve replacement has now really taken off for aortic stenosis. What we feature in this issue is a close look at the rapidly evolving world of not only mitral but also tricuspid valve intervention. These valves are more challenging to design appropriate technologies for, but there is a substantial unmet need for more minimally invasive ways of treating mitral and, especially, tricuspid valve disease. Read more in the Cover Story.

This issue also covers inferior vena cava (IVC) filter use, a very controversial area in endovascular medicine, with questions raised about efficacy and appropriateness. Hopefully, studies in the future will help clarify which patients benefit most from IVC filter placement. The Feature also outlines some exciting new developments in IVC filter technology.

Questions surrounding the optimal treatment strategy for patients with uncomplicated type B aortic dissection are debated in the At Issue. This will be of great interest to those endovascular specialists performing thoracic endovascular aortic repair, but also of interest to all CV specialists even if they don’t perform the actual procedure, as we all care for these patients when they come in emergently.

Finally, this issue also provides a recap of some of the interesting presentations from the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in November 2017 and, for the first time in Cardiology Today’s Intervention, from the International Stroke Conference. Stroke is a rapidly evolving area, with lessons for interventionalists to learn, even if they are not currently performing endovascular therapy for stroke.

Thus, this issue really does cover the full gamut of cardiac and vascular intervention. Let us know your thoughts by commenting online or emailing the Editors at intervention@healio.com.

Deepak L. Bhatt, MD, MPH

Chief Medical Editor

Cardiology Today’s Intervention

This is an action-packed March/April issue of Cardiology Today’s Intervention. In this issue, our experts cover a variety of exciting developments in interventional medicine.

An area that has been generating a lot of interest among interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons is percutaneous approaches to valvular heart disease. Of course, transcatheter aortic valve replacement has now really taken off for aortic stenosis. What we feature in this issue is a close look at the rapidly evolving world of not only mitral but also tricuspid valve intervention. These valves are more challenging to design appropriate technologies for, but there is a substantial unmet need for more minimally invasive ways of treating mitral and, especially, tricuspid valve disease. Read more in the Cover Story.

This issue also covers inferior vena cava (IVC) filter use, a very controversial area in endovascular medicine, with questions raised about efficacy and appropriateness. Hopefully, studies in the future will help clarify which patients benefit most from IVC filter placement. The Feature also outlines some exciting new developments in IVC filter technology.

Questions surrounding the optimal treatment strategy for patients with uncomplicated type B aortic dissection are debated in the At Issue. This will be of great interest to those endovascular specialists performing thoracic endovascular aortic repair, but also of interest to all CV specialists even if they don’t perform the actual procedure, as we all care for these patients when they come in emergently.

Finally, this issue also provides a recap of some of the interesting presentations from the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in November 2017 and, for the first time in Cardiology Today’s Intervention, from the International Stroke Conference. Stroke is a rapidly evolving area, with lessons for interventionalists to learn, even if they are not currently performing endovascular therapy for stroke.

Thus, this issue really does cover the full gamut of cardiac and vascular intervention. Let us know your thoughts by commenting online or emailing the Editors at intervention@healio.com.

Deepak L. Bhatt, MD, MPH

Chief Medical Editor

Cardiology Today’s Intervention