Meeting News

Complex patients with PAD, CLI featured in VIVA.18 late-breakers

Studies of high-risk patients with peripheral artery disease or critical limb ischemia and those with complicated disease states are some of the late-breaking clinical trials that have been selected for presentation at VIVA.18 from Nov. 5 to 8 in Las Vegas.

The 19 late-breaking clinical trials are the most ever presented at this meeting, according to an announcement from VIVA Physicians.

The presentations include the 5-year results of the IN.PACT SFA trial, which assessed the safety and effectiveness of a drug-eluting balloon (IN.PACT Admiral, Medtronic) in Chinese patients treated for new and non-stented restenotic lesions in the superficial femoral artery and proximal popliteal artery.

One-year results of the TOBA II trial will also be presented. In that study, patients with dissections in the superficial femoral and proximal popliteal arteries after balloon angioplasty received an endovascular system (Tack, Intact Vascular).

Comparisons were also made regarding outcomes of men and women who received a drug-coated balloon (Stellarex, Spectranetics) for the treatment of femoropopliteal lesions.

In the DETOUR I trial, outcomes at 18 months were analyzed in patients with long blockages in the SFA who underwent the PQ Detour procedure (PQ Bypass).

Patients with symptomatic PAD in the PREVEIL trial who had de novo stenoses of the femoral and popliteal arteries were treated with a novel DCB (SurVeil, SurModics) and followed up for 1 year.

A DCB (Lutonix, C.R. Bard) was compared with a standard balloon angioplasty in patients with stenosis or occlusion in native below-the-knee arteries in the Lutonix Below-the-Knee Global DCB IDE Study.

The SENTRY clinical trial enrolled patients at high risk for pulmonary embolism to see whether a filter (Sentry IVC Bioconvertible Filter, Novate Medical) temporarily protected patients against the disease.

Another study focused on patients with iliofemoral occlusive disease who were treated with a venous stent (Venovo, Bard) and followed up for up to 36 months.

Cardiology Today’s Intervention and Healio.com/Cardiology will be reporting live from the meeting. Stay tuned for news, perspectives and more.

Studies of high-risk patients with peripheral artery disease or critical limb ischemia and those with complicated disease states are some of the late-breaking clinical trials that have been selected for presentation at VIVA.18 from Nov. 5 to 8 in Las Vegas.

The 19 late-breaking clinical trials are the most ever presented at this meeting, according to an announcement from VIVA Physicians.

The presentations include the 5-year results of the IN.PACT SFA trial, which assessed the safety and effectiveness of a drug-eluting balloon (IN.PACT Admiral, Medtronic) in Chinese patients treated for new and non-stented restenotic lesions in the superficial femoral artery and proximal popliteal artery.

One-year results of the TOBA II trial will also be presented. In that study, patients with dissections in the superficial femoral and proximal popliteal arteries after balloon angioplasty received an endovascular system (Tack, Intact Vascular).

Comparisons were also made regarding outcomes of men and women who received a drug-coated balloon (Stellarex, Spectranetics) for the treatment of femoropopliteal lesions.

In the DETOUR I trial, outcomes at 18 months were analyzed in patients with long blockages in the SFA who underwent the PQ Detour procedure (PQ Bypass).

Patients with symptomatic PAD in the PREVEIL trial who had de novo stenoses of the femoral and popliteal arteries were treated with a novel DCB (SurVeil, SurModics) and followed up for 1 year.

A DCB (Lutonix, C.R. Bard) was compared with a standard balloon angioplasty in patients with stenosis or occlusion in native below-the-knee arteries in the Lutonix Below-the-Knee Global DCB IDE Study.

The SENTRY clinical trial enrolled patients at high risk for pulmonary embolism to see whether a filter (Sentry IVC Bioconvertible Filter, Novate Medical) temporarily protected patients against the disease.

Another study focused on patients with iliofemoral occlusive disease who were treated with a venous stent (Venovo, Bard) and followed up for up to 36 months.

Cardiology Today’s Intervention and Healio.com/Cardiology will be reporting live from the meeting. Stay tuned for news, perspectives and more.

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