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Burnout rate more than 70% among interventional radiologists

More than 70% of interventional radiologists reported feeling burned out, according to the results of a survey presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting.

The burnout rate was higher in women than in men and was elevated in those who reported they work more than 80 hours per week.

Jacob Bundy, MD, MPH, general surgery resident at the University of Michigan School of Medicine, and colleagues conducted an anonymous online survey distributed to practicing interventional radiologists.

According to an abstract, the survey consisted of 34 questions in the form of queries on demographics and practice environment as well as the Maslach Burnout Inventory – Human Services Survey for Medical Personnel. Those with an emotional exhaustion score of at least 27 or a depersonalization score of at least 10 were considered to have burnout.

“Burnout, defined as a cluster of symptoms that occur in response to chronic emotional job-related stressors resulting in depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and a lack of personal accomplishment, has been implicated with impaired physician performance, decreased patient satisfaction, job dissatisfaction, early retirement and suicide,” Bundy and colleagues wrote in the abstract.

Among the 339 respondents, 87.9% were attendings, 22% were women, 40.1% practiced at academic centers and 44.8% performed interventions only.

Participants were stratified by hours worked per week; 4.4% worked less than 40 hours, 66.4% worked 40 to 60 hours, 23.9% worked 60 to 80 hours and 5.3% worked more than 80 hours.

More than 70% of interventional radiologists reported feeling burned out, according to the results of a survey presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting.
Source: Adobe Stock

Among the cohort, 90.6% reported taking calls, with 34.2% taking one to five calls per month and 46.6% taking six to 10 calls per month.

The mean score for emotional exhaustion was 29.7, the mean score for depersonalization was 10.7 and the mean score for personal achievement was 39.7, according to the researchers.

The burnout rate among respondents was 72%, Bundy said during a presentation.

Identifying as a woman was associated with burnout (OR = 2.4; P = .0085), as was working more than 80 hours per week (OR = 7; P = .03), according to the researchers.

The following factors were not associated with burnout: practice level, diagnostic radiology duties, practice size, years of experience and number of calls taken. – by Erik Swain

Reference:

Bundy J, et al. Abstract 860. Presented at: Society of Interventional Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting; March 23-28, 2019; Austin, Texas.

Disclosure: Bundy reports no relevant financial disclosures

More than 70% of interventional radiologists reported feeling burned out, according to the results of a survey presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting.

The burnout rate was higher in women than in men and was elevated in those who reported they work more than 80 hours per week.

Jacob Bundy, MD, MPH, general surgery resident at the University of Michigan School of Medicine, and colleagues conducted an anonymous online survey distributed to practicing interventional radiologists.

According to an abstract, the survey consisted of 34 questions in the form of queries on demographics and practice environment as well as the Maslach Burnout Inventory – Human Services Survey for Medical Personnel. Those with an emotional exhaustion score of at least 27 or a depersonalization score of at least 10 were considered to have burnout.

“Burnout, defined as a cluster of symptoms that occur in response to chronic emotional job-related stressors resulting in depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and a lack of personal accomplishment, has been implicated with impaired physician performance, decreased patient satisfaction, job dissatisfaction, early retirement and suicide,” Bundy and colleagues wrote in the abstract.

Among the 339 respondents, 87.9% were attendings, 22% were women, 40.1% practiced at academic centers and 44.8% performed interventions only.

Participants were stratified by hours worked per week; 4.4% worked less than 40 hours, 66.4% worked 40 to 60 hours, 23.9% worked 60 to 80 hours and 5.3% worked more than 80 hours.

More than 70% of interventional radiologists reported feeling burned out, according to the results of a survey presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting.
Source: Adobe Stock

Among the cohort, 90.6% reported taking calls, with 34.2% taking one to five calls per month and 46.6% taking six to 10 calls per month.

The mean score for emotional exhaustion was 29.7, the mean score for depersonalization was 10.7 and the mean score for personal achievement was 39.7, according to the researchers.

The burnout rate among respondents was 72%, Bundy said during a presentation.

Identifying as a woman was associated with burnout (OR = 2.4; P = .0085), as was working more than 80 hours per week (OR = 7; P = .03), according to the researchers.

The following factors were not associated with burnout: practice level, diagnostic radiology duties, practice size, years of experience and number of calls taken. – by Erik Swain

Reference:

Bundy J, et al. Abstract 860. Presented at: Society of Interventional Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting; March 23-28, 2019; Austin, Texas.

Disclosure: Bundy reports no relevant financial disclosures

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