In the Journals

Peripheral arterial intervention practice patterns shifting

From 2006 to 2016, the percentage of patients presenting with critical limb ischemia, rates of femoral-popliteal intervention and the use of balloon angioplasty or cutting/scoring balloons increased in those with peripheral artery disease, researchers reported.

To assess trends in peripheral arterial interventions, researchers evaluated data from 43 hospitals participating in the prospective, multicenter, observational quality improvement BMC2 PVI Registry. From 2006 to 2013, 44,650 peripheral arterial interventions were performed.

Procedural indication varied significantly during the study period, according to the data. More than half (58.6%) of the 1,677 interventions performed in 2006 were for claudication vs. 44.6% of the 9,185 interventions performed in 2013 (P = .025). In contrast, 24.1% of interventions performed in 2006 were for CLI vs. 47.5% in 2013 (P < .001).

Location of the vascular beds treated also changed during the study period, with the percentage of renal interventions decreasing from 18% in 2006 to 5.6% in 2013 (P < .001). Conversely, femoral-popliteal interventions increased from 54.9% of overall peripheral arterial interventions in 2006 to 64.5% in 2013 (P < .001).

The researchers noted no significant trend for aorta-iliac or below-the-knee interventions.

Balloon angioplasty and cutting/scoring balloon use became more common as well. The percentage of interventions that involved balloon angioplasty increased from 67.6% in 2006 to 85.4% in 2013 (P = .029). Similarly, use of cutting/scoring balloon increased from 1.8% to 15.1% during the study period (P < .001). Cryo-balloon usage, however, decreased from 5% to 0.6% (P < .001).

No significant temporal trend was found for stenting, atherectomy and laser therapy, the researchers noted.

“These findings shed light on contemporary practice patterns related to the percutaneous management of PAD and suggest the need for additional studies to define optimal treatment strategies,” the researchers wrote. – by Melissa Foster

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

From 2006 to 2016, the percentage of patients presenting with critical limb ischemia, rates of femoral-popliteal intervention and the use of balloon angioplasty or cutting/scoring balloons increased in those with peripheral artery disease, researchers reported.

To assess trends in peripheral arterial interventions, researchers evaluated data from 43 hospitals participating in the prospective, multicenter, observational quality improvement BMC2 PVI Registry. From 2006 to 2013, 44,650 peripheral arterial interventions were performed.

Procedural indication varied significantly during the study period, according to the data. More than half (58.6%) of the 1,677 interventions performed in 2006 were for claudication vs. 44.6% of the 9,185 interventions performed in 2013 (P = .025). In contrast, 24.1% of interventions performed in 2006 were for CLI vs. 47.5% in 2013 (P < .001).

Location of the vascular beds treated also changed during the study period, with the percentage of renal interventions decreasing from 18% in 2006 to 5.6% in 2013 (P < .001). Conversely, femoral-popliteal interventions increased from 54.9% of overall peripheral arterial interventions in 2006 to 64.5% in 2013 (P < .001).

The researchers noted no significant trend for aorta-iliac or below-the-knee interventions.

Balloon angioplasty and cutting/scoring balloon use became more common as well. The percentage of interventions that involved balloon angioplasty increased from 67.6% in 2006 to 85.4% in 2013 (P = .029). Similarly, use of cutting/scoring balloon increased from 1.8% to 15.1% during the study period (P < .001). Cryo-balloon usage, however, decreased from 5% to 0.6% (P < .001).

No significant temporal trend was found for stenting, atherectomy and laser therapy, the researchers noted.

“These findings shed light on contemporary practice patterns related to the percutaneous management of PAD and suggest the need for additional studies to define optimal treatment strategies,” the researchers wrote. – by Melissa Foster

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.