Seven developments in rhinitis, upper respiratory allergy symptoms

Recent research involving rhinitis has focused on risk factors including stress, antibiotic use and mold exposure, as well as therapy including subcutaneous or sublingual immunotherapy.

In addition, the FDA has approved GlaxoSmithKline’s fluticasone propionate 50 mcg spray for over-the-counter treatment of hay fever and upper respiratory allergy symptoms. Here are highlights of studies and actions presented in Healio Allergy/Immunology:

Stress worsened allergic rhinitis flares

Researchers have established a link between emotional stress and allergic rhinitis flares, according to study data published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

“Stress can cause several negative effects on the body, including causing more symptoms for allergy sufferers,” Amber M. Patterson, MD, ACAAI, of the Ohio State University College of Medicine, said in a press release. “Our study also found those with more frequent allergy flares also have a greater negative mood, which may be leading to these flares.” Read more

Antibiotic use, mold exposure in infancy increased adolescents’ risk for allergic rhinitis

Adolescents exposed to antibiotic use and mold exposure during infancy had an increased risk for developing allergic rhinitis, according to recent study results.

Researchers recruited 7,389 students (mean age, 13.9 years; 55.9% female) in Seoul, South Korea, with parents or guardians completing the International Study of Asthma and Allergies Childhood questionnaire. Read more

SCIT, SLIT may be underused for allergic rhinitis symptoms

Recent data suggest that subcutaneous or sublingual immunotherapy may be an underused option that could benefit patients who are unable to manage their allergic rhinitis symptoms with oral and intranasal antihistamines, decongestants, and corticosteroid nasal sprays.

Robert Anolik, MD, of Allergy & Asthma Specialists in Blue Bell, Pa., and colleagues conducted a retrospective review of electronic health records of patients treated there with allergic rhinitis. The researchers reported that 36.2% of 8,790 patients (57% adults) initiated subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT; 78%) or sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT; 22%). Read more

Lower heart attack risk observed in patients with allergic rhinitis

Individuals with allergic rhinitis had a lower risk for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, according to research presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology annual meeting.

“Other research in the field has studied the relationship between asthma and heart disease,” Angelina M. Crans Yoon, MD, a primary care physician in Los Angeles, Calif., said. “Yet the relationship between allergic rhinitis and heart disease is mostly unknown, which is why we wanted to learn more.” Watch video

Local allergic rhinitis may not always progress to classic allergic rhinitis

Local allergic rhinitis may not always evolve into the classic form of allergic rhinitis, according to data from an ongoing study.

“After 5 years, the subjects with [local allergic rhinitis] experienced worsening of the rhinitis, reflected in the assessment of both the physician and the patient, in the use of emergency assistance, and in the increased prevalence of conjunctivitis,” Carmen Rondón, MD, PhD, of the allergy service at Carlos Haya Hospital in Malaga, Spain, and colleagues wrote. Read more

FDA approves Flonase for OTC allergy treatment

GlaxoSmithKline announced that the FDA has approved its fluticasone propionate 50 mcg spray for over-the-counter treatment of hay fever and upper respiratory allergy symptoms, according to a press release.

Flonase Allergy Relief nasal spray will be available at full prescription strength to provide 24-hour non-drowsy allergy relief beginning early in 2015. Read more

Two-thirds of Americans have allergies; only half seek treatment

Approximately 67% of Americans have seasonal or perennial allergy symptoms, but only half are currently seeing a medical professional, according to survey results.

Linda Bryson

Jill Bryson

“Patients need to discuss symptoms during their next visit to the doctor and doctors need to encourage this conversation,” Jill Bryson, MD, primary care physician at Benton Family Clinic, a Baptist Health affiliate in Benton, Ark., said in the press release. “Golfers, runners, soccer players, outdoor enthusiasts — don’t miss out this year. Allergies can often be easily addressed through immunotherapy that provides long-lasting relief instead of briefly masking symptoms.” Read more

Recent research involving rhinitis has focused on risk factors including stress, antibiotic use and mold exposure, as well as therapy including subcutaneous or sublingual immunotherapy.

In addition, the FDA has approved GlaxoSmithKline’s fluticasone propionate 50 mcg spray for over-the-counter treatment of hay fever and upper respiratory allergy symptoms. Here are highlights of studies and actions presented in Healio Allergy/Immunology:

Stress worsened allergic rhinitis flares

Researchers have established a link between emotional stress and allergic rhinitis flares, according to study data published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

“Stress can cause several negative effects on the body, including causing more symptoms for allergy sufferers,” Amber M. Patterson, MD, ACAAI, of the Ohio State University College of Medicine, said in a press release. “Our study also found those with more frequent allergy flares also have a greater negative mood, which may be leading to these flares.” Read more

Antibiotic use, mold exposure in infancy increased adolescents’ risk for allergic rhinitis

Adolescents exposed to antibiotic use and mold exposure during infancy had an increased risk for developing allergic rhinitis, according to recent study results.

Researchers recruited 7,389 students (mean age, 13.9 years; 55.9% female) in Seoul, South Korea, with parents or guardians completing the International Study of Asthma and Allergies Childhood questionnaire. Read more

SCIT, SLIT may be underused for allergic rhinitis symptoms

Recent data suggest that subcutaneous or sublingual immunotherapy may be an underused option that could benefit patients who are unable to manage their allergic rhinitis symptoms with oral and intranasal antihistamines, decongestants, and corticosteroid nasal sprays.

Robert Anolik, MD, of Allergy & Asthma Specialists in Blue Bell, Pa., and colleagues conducted a retrospective review of electronic health records of patients treated there with allergic rhinitis. The researchers reported that 36.2% of 8,790 patients (57% adults) initiated subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT; 78%) or sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT; 22%). Read more

Lower heart attack risk observed in patients with allergic rhinitis

Individuals with allergic rhinitis had a lower risk for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, according to research presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology annual meeting.

“Other research in the field has studied the relationship between asthma and heart disease,” Angelina M. Crans Yoon, MD, a primary care physician in Los Angeles, Calif., said. “Yet the relationship between allergic rhinitis and heart disease is mostly unknown, which is why we wanted to learn more.” Watch video

Local allergic rhinitis may not always progress to classic allergic rhinitis

Local allergic rhinitis may not always evolve into the classic form of allergic rhinitis, according to data from an ongoing study.

“After 5 years, the subjects with [local allergic rhinitis] experienced worsening of the rhinitis, reflected in the assessment of both the physician and the patient, in the use of emergency assistance, and in the increased prevalence of conjunctivitis,” Carmen Rondón, MD, PhD, of the allergy service at Carlos Haya Hospital in Malaga, Spain, and colleagues wrote. Read more

FDA approves Flonase for OTC allergy treatment

GlaxoSmithKline announced that the FDA has approved its fluticasone propionate 50 mcg spray for over-the-counter treatment of hay fever and upper respiratory allergy symptoms, according to a press release.

Flonase Allergy Relief nasal spray will be available at full prescription strength to provide 24-hour non-drowsy allergy relief beginning early in 2015. Read more

Two-thirds of Americans have allergies; only half seek treatment

Approximately 67% of Americans have seasonal or perennial allergy symptoms, but only half are currently seeing a medical professional, according to survey results.

Linda Bryson

Jill Bryson

“Patients need to discuss symptoms during their next visit to the doctor and doctors need to encourage this conversation,” Jill Bryson, MD, primary care physician at Benton Family Clinic, a Baptist Health affiliate in Benton, Ark., said in the press release. “Golfers, runners, soccer players, outdoor enthusiasts — don’t miss out this year. Allergies can often be easily addressed through immunotherapy that provides long-lasting relief instead of briefly masking symptoms.” Read more