Meeting News Coverage

Parental history of snoring, air pollution exposure linked to snoring in children

LOS ANGELES — A history of parental snoring was significantly associated with snoring among children at the age of 7, according to results from an allergy and air pollution study presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting.

To determine the prevalence of habitual snoring in children born to atopic parents and to assess the relationship between habitual snoring, atopic status and exposure to traffic pollution, the researchers examined a prospective birth cohort consisting of 609 children from the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study (CCAAPS).

“To our knowledge, this is the first birth cohort in the United States examining longitudinal predictors of snoring in children born to atopic parents,” researcher Jennifer A. Kannan, MD, of University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, told Healio.com/Allergy.

Clinical evaluations and questionnaires concerning allergic and respiratory symptoms, environmental exposures, and snoring frequency at ages 1 to 4 and 7 were completed by study participants. Snoring frequencies were classified as: never (< 1 night/week), sometimes (1-2 nights/week) and frequently (≥ 3 nights/week).

A land-use regression model was employed to estimate traffic pollution exposure (TRAP). To determine the association between early (< age 4) and current (age 7) allergic disease, environmental exposures, and snoring at age 7, a proportional odds logistic regression was used.

“Our study found that an early history of maternal snoring (ages 1-4) was significantly associated with snoring at age 7,” Kannan said. “Early rhinitis and early wheezing (ages 1-4) were associated but not statistically significant with snoring at age 7. A history of parental snoring, upper respiratory tract infections and exposure to traffic pollution at age 7 were significantly associated with snoring at age 7.”

According to Kannan, “Clinicians evaluating children with these characteristics should consider screening for sleep disorders which can have harmful health effects.” — by Alaina Tedesco

Reference: Kannan JA, et al. Abstract 640. Presented at: American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting; March 4-7, 2016; Los Angeles.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures. Funding provided by National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) R01ES11170, R01ES019890.

LOS ANGELES — A history of parental snoring was significantly associated with snoring among children at the age of 7, according to results from an allergy and air pollution study presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting.

To determine the prevalence of habitual snoring in children born to atopic parents and to assess the relationship between habitual snoring, atopic status and exposure to traffic pollution, the researchers examined a prospective birth cohort consisting of 609 children from the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study (CCAAPS).

“To our knowledge, this is the first birth cohort in the United States examining longitudinal predictors of snoring in children born to atopic parents,” researcher Jennifer A. Kannan, MD, of University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, told Healio.com/Allergy.

Clinical evaluations and questionnaires concerning allergic and respiratory symptoms, environmental exposures, and snoring frequency at ages 1 to 4 and 7 were completed by study participants. Snoring frequencies were classified as: never (< 1 night/week), sometimes (1-2 nights/week) and frequently (≥ 3 nights/week).

A land-use regression model was employed to estimate traffic pollution exposure (TRAP). To determine the association between early (< age 4) and current (age 7) allergic disease, environmental exposures, and snoring at age 7, a proportional odds logistic regression was used.

“Our study found that an early history of maternal snoring (ages 1-4) was significantly associated with snoring at age 7,” Kannan said. “Early rhinitis and early wheezing (ages 1-4) were associated but not statistically significant with snoring at age 7. A history of parental snoring, upper respiratory tract infections and exposure to traffic pollution at age 7 were significantly associated with snoring at age 7.”

According to Kannan, “Clinicians evaluating children with these characteristics should consider screening for sleep disorders which can have harmful health effects.” — by Alaina Tedesco

Reference: Kannan JA, et al. Abstract 640. Presented at: American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting; March 4-7, 2016; Los Angeles.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures. Funding provided by National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) R01ES11170, R01ES019890.

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