In the Journals

Enhanced allergic rhinitis control needed among urban children with asthma

Recent data suggest that strategies to enhance allergic rhinitis control in urban children with asthma also may improve quality of life measures.

“Asthma and allergic rhinitis are common, comorbid conditions in children,” Robin S. Everhart, PhD, of the department of psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University, and colleagues wrote. “Epidemiologic reports suggest that 60% to 80% of children with asthma experience rhinitis symptoms.”

The researchers studied associations among allergic rhinitis control, asthma control, allergy symptoms, asthma symptoms, and the quality of life (QOL) in allergic rhinitis of 195 black, Latino, and non-Latino white urban caregivers and their children with asthma (aged 7 to 9 years). Using parent and patient assessments of daily asthma and nasal symptoms, researchers found that better allergic rhinitis control was associated with greater levels of QOL (P<.01) and all QOL subscales, including nose and eye symptoms.

In addition, control of allergic rhinitis predicted QOL over and above asthma control (P<.01), researchers wrote.

Additional data indicated that non-Latino white children reported better QOL compared with Latinos and blacks (P<.05).

“Clinical implications might include changing or reinforcing recommendations to improve [allergic rhinitis] control (eg, medications, adherence and avoiding allergens) during clinic visits with children and their families,” the researchers concluded.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Recent data suggest that strategies to enhance allergic rhinitis control in urban children with asthma also may improve quality of life measures.

“Asthma and allergic rhinitis are common, comorbid conditions in children,” Robin S. Everhart, PhD, of the department of psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University, and colleagues wrote. “Epidemiologic reports suggest that 60% to 80% of children with asthma experience rhinitis symptoms.”

The researchers studied associations among allergic rhinitis control, asthma control, allergy symptoms, asthma symptoms, and the quality of life (QOL) in allergic rhinitis of 195 black, Latino, and non-Latino white urban caregivers and their children with asthma (aged 7 to 9 years). Using parent and patient assessments of daily asthma and nasal symptoms, researchers found that better allergic rhinitis control was associated with greater levels of QOL (P<.01) and all QOL subscales, including nose and eye symptoms.

In addition, control of allergic rhinitis predicted QOL over and above asthma control (P<.01), researchers wrote.

Additional data indicated that non-Latino white children reported better QOL compared with Latinos and blacks (P<.05).

“Clinical implications might include changing or reinforcing recommendations to improve [allergic rhinitis] control (eg, medications, adherence and avoiding allergens) during clinic visits with children and their families,” the researchers concluded.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.