In the Journals

Angioedema deaths in US uncommon

Angioedema-related mortality in the United States from 1979 to 2010 was rare, with hereditary angioedema deaths decreasing and nonhereditary angioedema deaths increasing, according to recent study results.

The researchers analyzed all US death certificates during the study range in which angioedema was listed as an underlying or contributing cause of death. Age, sex and race were used to analyze age-adjusted mortality rates. Other underlying causes of death also were examined.

Angioedema was listed as a contributing cause in 5,758 deaths. The age-adjusted annual death rate per million persons for hereditary angioedema (HAE) decreased from 0.28 (95% CI, 0.25-0.32) in 1999 to 2002 to 0.06 (95% CI, 0.05-0.08) in 2007 to 2010.

“Conversely, mortality for angioedema increased from 0.24 (95% CI, 0.21-0.27) to 0.34 (95% CI, 0.31-0.37) per million [during the same time period],” the researchers wrote.

Fifty-five percent of angioedema deaths associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were experienced by black patients.

In analyzing death certificates, the most commonly listed underlying cause of death was HAE (45%), followed by cancer (27%), most frequently lymphoma or leukemia.

“This is the first US population-based study of angioedema-related mortality,” the researchers wrote. “The number of angioedema-associated deaths was very small, with fewer than 2,000 from 1999 to 2010.

“The present data suggest that deaths attributed to HAE are becoming even rarer, whereas deaths associated with angioedema are increasing. In the future, more granular coding systems could help distinguish HAE cases from other cases of angioedema, including [acquired angioedema].”

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Angioedema-related mortality in the United States from 1979 to 2010 was rare, with hereditary angioedema deaths decreasing and nonhereditary angioedema deaths increasing, according to recent study results.

The researchers analyzed all US death certificates during the study range in which angioedema was listed as an underlying or contributing cause of death. Age, sex and race were used to analyze age-adjusted mortality rates. Other underlying causes of death also were examined.

Angioedema was listed as a contributing cause in 5,758 deaths. The age-adjusted annual death rate per million persons for hereditary angioedema (HAE) decreased from 0.28 (95% CI, 0.25-0.32) in 1999 to 2002 to 0.06 (95% CI, 0.05-0.08) in 2007 to 2010.

“Conversely, mortality for angioedema increased from 0.24 (95% CI, 0.21-0.27) to 0.34 (95% CI, 0.31-0.37) per million [during the same time period],” the researchers wrote.

Fifty-five percent of angioedema deaths associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were experienced by black patients.

In analyzing death certificates, the most commonly listed underlying cause of death was HAE (45%), followed by cancer (27%), most frequently lymphoma or leukemia.

“This is the first US population-based study of angioedema-related mortality,” the researchers wrote. “The number of angioedema-associated deaths was very small, with fewer than 2,000 from 1999 to 2010.

“The present data suggest that deaths attributed to HAE are becoming even rarer, whereas deaths associated with angioedema are increasing. In the future, more granular coding systems could help distinguish HAE cases from other cases of angioedema, including [acquired angioedema].”

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.